Branched broomrape

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Communique

August 2011

The Branched Broomrape National Management Group (NMG) met on 11 August 2011 and agreed that it was no longer technically feasible to eradicate the weed and that the eradication program be wound-up by the end of this financial year.

The NMG recognised Branched broomrape remained a weed of potentially significant trade and production impacts, requiring a national approach to its containment and ongoing management. It agreed that Biosecurity South Australia, with the support of a national steering committee, should prepare a strategy for the future management of the weed.

In making its decision, the NMG took into account advice from the Consultative Committee for Exotic Plant Incursions (CCEPI)—a coordinating body which provides technical advice for national responses to exotic weed incursions in Australia.  The CCEPI advised it was no longer feasible to eradicate the weed based on the findings of an independent review of the eradication program and advice from its own Scientific Advisory Panel.

The independent review found that while the eradication program had lessened the spread of the weed and had been well managed, eradication was unlikely to be achieved.  The panel recommended a shift from eradication to containment and ongoing management, including the ability to declare products and properties to be free of the weed.

The NMG acknowledged the significant commitment and effort by the South Australian Government in managing and operating the eradication program for more than 10 years.

Branched broomrape is an exotic parasitic weed which affects a range of broadleaf crops, broadleaf weeds and native plants. 
 
The Branched broomrape NMG is comprised of the Chief Executive Officers, or their delegates, of national and state/territory departments of agriculture/primary industries across Australia, and the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities.  Representatives of Plant Health Australia also attend but have no voting rights. The group is chaired by the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry.

The CCEPI is comprised of senior delegates of national and state/territory departments of agriculture/primary industries across Australia, technical experts appropriate for the weed of concern, and representatives of Plant Health Australia in an observer capacity.

Further information on Branched broomrape can be found on the website at Biosecurity South Australia’s website.