Australian Animal Welfare Strategy (AAWS) and National Implementation Plan 2010-14

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ISBN: 978-1-921575-29-7

The Australian Animal Welfare Strategy (AAWS) has been developed to outline directions for future improvements in the welfare of animals and to provide national and international communities with an appreciation of animal welfare arrangements in Australia. It was jointly developed by the Australian Government, state and territory governments, industry and the community. The production of the AAWS was coordinated by the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry on behalf of the Primary Industries Standing Committee. The Primary Industries Ministerial Council endorsed the AAWS in May 2004 and the first National Implementation Plan for the strategy in May 2006.

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Australian Animal Welfare Strategy

Vision: All Australians value animals and are committed to improving their welfare. Mission: To deliver sustainable improvements in the welfare of all animals.

This table shows the framework for the AAWS
Animals National systems People International
AAWS goals
1. The welfare needs of animals are understood and met. 2. National systems deliver consistent animal welfare outcomes and give priority to ongoing improvements. 3. People make ethical decisions regarding animal welfare, supported by knowledge and skills. 4. Australia is actively engaged in international partnerships and developments to improve animal welfare.
Objectives
1. Monitor trends.

2. Act on key issues.

3. Deliver improvements.

4. Understand drivers, impediments and opportunities.

5. Cooperate for consistency.

6. Collaborate for efficiency.

7. Engage stakeholders.

8. Inform the community.

9. Create, use and share knowledge.

10. Articulate Australia's perspective.

11. Collaborate internationally.

12. Learn from international experience.

Outcomes
(the intended results, impacts or consequences of actions)
Activities lead to positive change in the welfare of animals. Streamlined, efficient, transparent and successful processes are developed to deliver nationally consistent animal welfare outcomes. The strategy provides a basis for engagement and education of diverse stakeholder groups and interests. Australia assists the development and delivery of improved animal welfare outcomes regionally and globally.
Benefits
(measurable improvements resulting from an outcome, perceived as an advantage by one or more stakeholders)
Animals have greater wellbeing through improved levels of care and management. Effective and efficient processes and application of resources are used to develop and implement animal welfare policies and systems. The community engages in balanced, informed debate about animal welfare issues. Australia's systems, expertise and reputation are enhanced through active engagement and partnerships.
Performance measures
(indicators of success)
  • Appropriate animal welfare measures are developed and used.
  • Deficiencies are recognised, discussed with stakeholders and addressed.
  • Annual AAWS report on Australia's animal welfare system is prepared and regularly updated, and trends are analysed.
  • Efficiency in animal welfare activities is achieved through cooperation.
  • National consistency in animal welfare outcomes is achieved.
  • Animal welfare information is continually developed and delivered.
  • Attitudes, perceptions and behaviours are informed.
  • Participation in animal welfare education and training programs increases.
  • Sharing of resources between stakeholder groups increases.
  • Australia is rated as equivalent to or better than international benchmarks, following formal evaluations.
  • World Organisation for Animal Health and other international organisations continue to seek Australian expertise.
Forecast AAWS expenditure, 2010-14 (total = $4 007 000)
$1 167 913 (29%) $528 818 (13%) $1 927 269 (48%) $383 000 (10%)
Estimated additional stakeholder contributions (total = $4 530 623)
$1 718 999 $970 500 $1 47xc6 124 $365 000

Acknowledgments

The Australian Animal Welfare Strategy (AAWS) relies on dedicated people who have a commitment to improving the welfare of Australian animals. This dedication is illustrated by the way that people from different sectors actively contribute, engage, exchange information and debate the changes needed to make a real difference to animal welfare in Australia.

The strategy has evolved since 2004 as a result of the need to update content and simplify both the strategy and the supporting National Implementation Plan. The revision was led by the AAWS Advisory Committee, with important input from a meeting of approximately 120 stakeholders in July 2010. These stakeholders were drawn from industry, research organisations, community animal welfare organisations, professional associations, and the Australian, state and territory governments. The contribution that all parties have made to this revised strategy is recognised and gratefully acknowledged.

Acronyms

AAWS — Australian Animal Welfare Strategy
CSIRO —  Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
DAFF —  Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry
OIE —  World Organisation for Animal Health
PIMC — Primary Industries Ministerial Council
RSPCA —  Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

Animal welfare activities within Australia require the commitment and support of many organisations. A list of participants in AAWS phase 1 is provided in Attachment 4.

Executive summary

Animals are socially, culturally and economically important for Australia. They are core to our national identity, feature on our currency and are widely adopted as logos for our sporting teams. They provide us with companionship, recreation, entertainment, assistance, health and ecological services, and food and fibre. Animal and related industries generate many billions of dollars of economic activity and tens of thousands of jobs across rural, regional and urban Australia. The welfare of animals and the welfare of humans are closely linked.

Animal welfare reflects the ethical imperative and social expectation that any use of animals for the benefit of humans should minimise suffering of the animals involved. Welfare is related to health and wellbeing. However, it extends beyond survival to also consider the quality of an animal’s life.

The Australian Animal Welfare Strategy focuses attention on key animal welfare issues and coordinated investments to deliver sustainable improvements. The strategy has relevance for the entire community. It covers all sentient animals—that is, those with a capacity to experience suffering and pleasure. Sentience is the reason that welfare matters.

Achievements to date

The strategy was originally endorsed by the Primary Industries Ministerial Council in 2004, and the National Implementation Plan was endorsed in May 2006. Achievements under the strategy to date include:

  • the development of a solid framework for stakeholder consultation
  • identification of 23 elements for consistency across state and territory legislation and agreement from the jurisdictions to implement them
  • review and analysis of animal welfare issues and capacity across the six animal use sectors, and in the areas of communications, education and training, and research and development
  • endorsement of a policy to move from voluntary model codes of practice for the welfare of livestock to national standards and guidelines, with greater consistency in regulation
  • agreement to extend the development of standards and guidelines to nonproduction animals
  • endorsement of new Australian animal welfare standards and guidelines—land transport of livestock
  • development and publication of a model for assessing the humaneness of vertebrate pest control strategies
  • the successful AAWS International Animal Welfare Conference in 2008.

Phase 2

The strategy was updated in 2010, following an independent review and extensive stakeholder consultation. Phase 2, which will build on the achievements to date, will run from 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2014.

The strategy’s vision is that all Australians value animals and are committed to improving their welfare. Its mission is to deliver sustainable improvements in the welfare of all animals.

The strategy has four primary areas of work: animals, national systems, people and international. The expected benefits that will flow include the following:

  • Animals will experience better levels of care and management.
  • Governments and others investing in the development and implementation of animal welfare policies and systems will see greater efficiency and value through streamlined processes and reduced duplication.
  • Animal welfare issues will be subjected to balanced debate and consideration within the community.
  • Australia’s animal welfare systems, expertise and international reputation will be enhanced through active international engagement and partnerships.

The strategy provides a national framework to identify priorities, coordinate stakeholder action and improve consistency across all animal use sectors. It seeks to build on Australia’s current arrangements, including state and territory legislation, standards, guidelines, codes of practice, industry quality assurance programs, education and training, and research and development. It acknowledges the importance of broad engagement with industry, governments, professional associations, service providers, researchers and welfare organisations to accurately assess issues and develop robust solutions.

Implementation of the strategy is a shared responsibility, which relies on the commitment of time, resources and funding from stakeholders across all sectors and from all levels of government. In particular, the strategy will look to the state and territory governments, who have responsibility for developing, implementing and enforcing animal welfare policies and legislation, to articulate how their current and proposed activities are consistent with the strategy and can support its goals and objectives. The Australian Government has committed approximately $4 million to phase 2 of the strategy. This funding will be used for specific joint initiatives to address priority issues at industry, sectoral and national levels. Co-contributions to activities under the strategy will continue to be sought from governments and other stakeholders.

Governance

The strategy is overseen by a skills-based advisory committee, which is responsible for driving its implementation. In conjunction with the national Animal Welfare Committee, the Advisory Committee will develop and secure agreement to an annual work plan and commitment of resources to activities that support the strategy’s objectives. The Advisory Committee and Animal Welfare Committee will also provide an annual report of progress against the strategy to ministers, governments and other stakeholders. National agreement to the strategy is provided through its endorsement by the Primary Industries Ministerial Council.

Technical working groups will continue to operate for each of the six key categories of animal use:

  • livestock and production animals
  • companion animal
  • aquatic animals
  • animals used in research and teaching
  • animals used for work, recreation, entertainment and display
  • native, introduced and feral animals.

Three additional groups provide tactical advice on the common issues of communications, education and training, and research and development.

The sectoral groups are responsible for applying the national priorities and overall strategic goals and objectives at an operational level, identifying projects and providing advice on issues. Members of the working groups will provide a connection between the strategy and stakeholder networks by supporting promotion of activities, outcomes and achievements, and facilitating feedback.

Australian Government funding for the strategy is approved by the Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, and administered by the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry. The department coordinates implementation and reporting of the strategy on behalf of the Advisory Committee and stakeholders.

National Implementation Plan

The National Implementation Plan has been developed using a program logic framework, which shows a series of consequences, not just events. It seeks to make clear the cause-and-effect relationships between activities, outputs, outcomes and benefits. This framework also supports program monitoring, evaluation, performance management and reporting. Implementation of the strategy is a shared responsibility.

Program reporting is an essential component of governance, stakeholder engagement and communications. Regular reports on activities, achievements and progress under the strategy will be prepared and distributed to stakeholders, and information will be made available online through websites that are accessible to the public or to participants only. An annual stakeholder workshop will provide opportunities to report progress, seek feedback, affirm priorities and strengthen networks.

Part 1: The Australian Animal Welfare Strategy

This section presents the Australian Animal Welfare Strategy, the issues it aims to address, and its goals and priorities. The section covers policy objectives, primary areas of effort and expected achievements between 2010 and 2014.

The strategy has been developed using a combination of an outputs–outcomes–benefits framework and a program logic model to clearly identify how the investments and activities undertaken will deliver results, the assumptions that have been made about the connections and pathways between investments and results, and the resources needed to achieve the identified aims.

Introduction

Key points:

  • Animal welfare means how an animal is coping with the conditions in which it lives.
  • Sentience is the reason that welfare matters.
  • The strategy is based on a national consultative approach and a firm commitment to achieving sustainable improvements.
  • All Australians have a duty of care to ensure that the welfare of animals is maintained and protected.
  • The strategy was initially endorsed by the Primary Industries Ministerial Council in May 2004.

Animal welfare is of social and strategic importance. The welfare of animals and the welfare of humans are closely linked. At the same time as expecting a better quality of life for themselves, people in modern society also expect that the quality of life should improve for companion, livestock, working and wild animals.

Australia accepts the agreed international definition of animal welfare from the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE):

Animal welfare means how an animal is coping with the conditions in which it lives. An animal is in a good state of welfare if (as indicated by scientific evi dence) it is healthy, comfortable, well nourished, safe, able to express innate behaviour, and if it is not suffering from unpleasant states such as pain, fear, and distress. Good animal welfare requires disease prevention and veterinary treatment, appropriate shelter, management, nutrition, humane handling and humane slaughter/killing. Animal welfare refers to the state of the animal; the treatment that an animal receives is covered by other terms such as animal care, animal husbandry, and humane treatment.1

The Australian Animal Welfare Strategy (AAWS) is a national approach that focuses attention on key animal welfare issues and investing in sustainable improvements. The strategy covers all sentient animals—that is, those with a capacity to experience suffering and pleasure—and has relevance for the entire Australian community.

Sentience, which implies a level of conscious awareness, is the reason that welfare matters. The management and treatment that sentient animals receive should not inflict unnecessary suffering. As guardians, custodians and caretakers, all Australians have a duty of care to ensure that the welfare of animals is maintained and protected. Animal husbandry and management practices must continue to evolve and improve as society’s expectations change.

The community has a deep regard for animals. Animal stories regularly feature in the mass media and provide a basis for popular television shows, documentaries and movies. Animals are part of our national identity, feature on our currency and are widely adopted as logos for our sporting teams. Animals also form a central part of the Australian economy and generate wealth and employment across rural, regional and urban Australia through agriculture, tourism, exhibition and recreation.

The AAWS provides a national framework to identify priorities, coordinate stakeholder action and improve consistency across all animal use sectors. It seeks to build on Australia’s current arrangements, including state and territory legislation, standards, guidelines, codes of practice, industry quality assurance programs, education and training, and research and development. It also acknowledges the importance of broad engagement with industry, governments, professional associations, service providers, researchers and welfare organisations to accurately assess issues and develop robust solutions.

The vision of the AAWS is:

All Australians value animals and are committed to improving their welfare.

Its mission is:

To deliver sustainable improvements in the welfare of all animals.

Outcomes and benefits expected to flow from the strategy have been identified across four primary areas of work: animals, national systems, people and international. The benefits include the following:

  • Animals will experience better levels of care and management.
  • Governments and others investing in the development and implementation of animal welfare policies and systems will see greater efficiency and value through streamlined processes and reduced duplication.
  • Animal welfare issues will be subjected to balanced debate and consideration within the community.
  • Australia’s animal welfare systems, expertise and international reputation will be enhanced through active international engagement and partnerships.

All stakeholders in the strategy are firmly committed to achieving continuous improvements in animal welfare and addressing key animal welfare issues through coordinated efforts and investments. The strategy:

  • provides a direction for future animal welfare policies
  • involves a national consultative process
  • recognises the various roles and responsibilities of key community, industry and government organisations and acknowledges their valuable contributions
  • seeks to secure ongoing, sustainable improvements in animal welfare by improving knowledge and understanding of animal welfare issues.

The AAWS was originally endorsed by the Primary Industries Ministerial Council in 2004, and the first National Implementation Plan was endorsed in May 2006. Achievements under the strategy to date include:

  • the development of a solid framework for stakeholder consultation
  • identification of 23 elements for consistency across state and territory legislation and agreement from the jurisdictions to implement them
  • review and analysis of animal welfare issues and capacity across the six animal use sectors, and in the areas of communications, education and training, and research and development
  • endorsement of a policy to move from voluntary model codes of practice for the welfare of livestock to national standards and guidelines, with greater consistency in regulation
  • agreement to extend the development of standards and guidelines to nonproduction animals
  • endorsement of new Australian animal welfare standards and guidelines—land transport of livestock
  • development and publication of a model for assessing the humaneness of vertebrate pest control strategies
  • the successful AAWS International Animal Welfare Conference in 2008.

The strategy was updated in 2010, following an independent review and extensive stakeholder consultation. Phase 2, which will build on the achievements to date, will run from 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2014.

Case study:

Companion animals

Australians own around 33 million pets and the companion animal sector is worth $6 billion. This highlights the enormous task the Companion Animals Working Group has for advocating animal welfare in this important community sector that covers animals in pet shops, horses in riding centre’s, breeding cats and dogs, security dogs, animals used in the film industry and animal transporting and boarding establishments.

During phase 1 of the AAWS, this working group progressed a national standard for nonproduction animals with the Council of Australian Government’s (COAG) decision-making process.

Work was undertaken to benchmark the companion animal sector. This identified the need to have an animal population management system that provides information on euthanasia rates and where pets are sourced from. It also revealed a need to continue to improve pet wellbeing, conduct more animal welfare research and develop consistent standards nationwide.

The priority in phase 2 will be to progress the development, consultation and endorsement of national standards for cats and dogs.

Policy objectives

Key points:

  • The AAWS provides a national framework for engagement, covering all animals and their wellbeing.
  • The AAWS seeks greater consistency in approaches to animal welfare across the states and territories.
  • The AAWS takes a multifaceted approach, based on four major areas of work: animals, national systems, people and the international scene.

The AAWS is Australia’s response to a number of welfare issues. It addresses a range of policy objectives, including that:

  • the welfare needs of animals are met by the people responsible for them, in line with scientific evidence and community expectations
  • appropriate, balanced information is readily available for people who are making decisions on animal welfare issues
  • there is national consistency in welfare requirements and outcomes.

The strategy is also a response to the community expectation that governments will play a central role in maintaining and protecting the welfare of animals as a public good.

Social responsibility

Welfare is a human responsibility towards animals. It encompasses all aspects of animal health and wellbeing. Welfare includes proper housing, management, population control, habitat management, nutrition, and disease prevention and treatment; responsible care; humane handling; and, when necessary, humane killing.

Individuals making decisions that affect the welfare of animals must be supported with information, knowledge and skills to fulfil their obligations and responsibilities. This information should be based on the best available evidence, and efforts should be made to ensure that the knowledge base is actively improved.

Guardianship

Animal welfare can involve complex ethical issues, and activities that are completely unacceptable in one context may be justified in another. Governments have a responsibility to act as guardians for animal welfare on behalf of citizens, develop and implement policy, ensure compliance and inform the community.

National consistency

The states and territories have primary legislative responsibility for animal welfare in Australia, and each has established its own laws and regulations. Stakeholders have acknowledged that inconsistencies in requirements between jurisdictions are an impediment to the development, implementation and promotion of a national approach to animal welfare.

Strategic positioning

Animal welfare is an issue of increasing importance within the international community as well as domestically, with implications for Australia’s reputation and trading position. Australia seeks to actively engage in international forums at the level of government, industry and nongovernment organisations to exchange ideas, share expertise, develop networks and partnerships, support the development and adoption of international animal welfare guidelines, and articulate Australia’s perspective.

Outcomes

The AAWS takes a multifaceted approach to delivering improved animal welfare, recognising that there are multiple areas of action and engagement. Under the four major areas of work, the strategy has the following aims:

  • Animals: The primary aim is to identify, understand, prioritise and act on things that have a direct impact on the welfare on animals.
  • National systems: Efforts will be made to reduce inconsistencies in the approaches to regulation and compliance used by different jurisdictions in Australia.
  • People: The delivery of improved animal welfare relies on people and their capacity to make and implement decisions, and this will guide investments to improve skills and understanding.
  • International: International awareness of the importance of animal welfare is growing. The strategy is a demonstration that Australia has a structured, national approach to animal welfare and allows our representatives to speak with authority.

The AAWS provides opportunities to:

  • strategically focus a group of experts to assist in identifying national and international emerging issues and, by keeping abreast and ahead of welfare matters generally, to offer advice on the best policy or operational response to given situations.
  • formalise high-level advice to all ministers, the Primary Industries Standing Committee and the Primary Industries Ministerial Council on strategic issues affecting animal welfare.
  • establish a process to achieve the strategic goal of national consistency in animal welfare arrangements, including legislation, other forms of regulation and industry standards.
  • enable the Australian community to demonstrate the value it places on animals, their humane treatment and the provision of appropriate care.

Operating environment

Key points:

  • Animal welfare is growing in importance for the Australian community. The AAWS is part of a network of animal welfare activities by a range of organisations.
  • Animals are economically, socially and culturally important for Australia.
  • Animal welfare is protected through state and territory legislation; standards, guidelines and codes of practice; and industry quality assurance programs. The Australian Government plays a coordinating role.
  • International developments in animal welfare provide guidance for the AAWS.

Animal welfare is a highly sensitive issue of growing importance. Retailers are changing product lines and marketing in response to consumer demand for ‘ethical’ products. Animal law courses are being introduced at universities across Australia. Pest animal management programs are being amended on the basis of community campaigns. Internationally, animal welfare considerations are being applied within a number of markets and are having a direct impact on trading relationships.

Animal industries form a central part of the Australian economy and generate wealth and employment across rural, regional and urban Australia. Livestock industries have a gross annual value of approximately $20 billion2; $6 billion is spent on the nation’s 33 million pet animals3; the horse sector contributes an estimated $6 billion to the national accounts; opportunities to view and interact with our unique wildlife are high on the wish-list for visitors, contributing to the $30-billion tourism industry; recreational fishing is one of Australia’s most popular pastimes and is backed by an industry worth $3 billion per year; and research advances continue to improve the health and wellbeing of both humans and animals. The challenges for animal welfare differ between species and between industries, but the need and desire to maintain, protect and improve the quality of life of animals applies across the board. Improving animal welfare contributes to the sustainability of industries and the overall Australian way of life.

In Australia, the welfare of animals is protected through legislation administered by the state and territory governments. Some industries provide an additional level of animal welfare protection through quality assurance programs. The Australian Government does not have legislative responsibility, but plays a leadership and coordination role to improve national consistency in legislation and outcome, and increase efficiency in public expenditure by reducing duplication of effort.

The AAWS is part of a network of animal welfare activities and approaches by specialist organisations, industry groups and government agencies. Australia has more than 400 organisations with a direct interest in animal welfare and the AAWS. The strategy provides a focal point and national framework for engaging all interested parties to deliver agreed national goals and objectives. It also responds to governments’ recognition that improving animal welfare outcomes is in the public interest.

The AAWS builds on Australia’s current arrangements, which include legislation, standards, guidelines, codes of practice, industry quality assurance programs, education and training, research and development, broad and ongoing consultation, and acceptance of international responsibilities.

There have been significant international developments in animal welfare, and the strategy recognises the guidance provided by agreed international principles, including:

  • the critical relationship between animal health and animal welfare
  • the recognised responsibilities or duty of care of animal carers and managers to maintain and protect their animals, including by providing adequate and appropriate food and water; protecting animals from fear and distress; minimising physical and thermal discomfort; protecting animals from pain, injury and disease; and providing opportunities for the expression of normal patterns of behaviour (the ‘five freedoms’ of animal welfare)
  • for animals used in research and teaching, the ‘three Rs’—reduction in numbers of animals, refinement of experimental methods and replacement of animals with nonanimal techniques.

The draft Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare that is being promoted by the World Society for the Protection of Animals and supported in concept by the OIE and many governments and nongovernment organisations is also a valuable guiding philosophy for efforts to improve the welfare of animals.

Case Study:

Development of Livestock Welfare Standards

Imagine being a livestock transporter in Australia where you must adhere to strict legal requirements—but they vary in each state? Transporting operators are currently faced with these logistical difficulties every time they routinely cross a border to deliver their goods.

This question of national consistency is now being addressed by Australian Government, industry bodies and animal welfare organisations through the development of harmonized livestock welfare laws.

The welfare of livestock is currently managed by a series of Model Codes of Practice for the Welfare of Animals which is interpreted differently into individual state and territory legislation. A review of the Codes in 2005 identified ambiguity of the codes as a concern and recommended a move to national harmonization.

The review determined that under the current system, industry representatives find the codes difficult to read and access key information in a user friendly format. This poses several issues for various business transactions, in particular transport. Difference in state and territory legislation causes confusion leading to inefficiency and increased costs.

The redevelopment of the Model Codes of Practice will deliver animal welfare outcomes that meet community and international expectations and reflect Australia’s position as a leader in modern, sustainable and scientifically-based welfare practice.

An Australian approach

Key points:

  • The AAWS is for all animals, not just those used for production.
  • The AAWS provides opportunities to share knowledge and debate animal welfare issues.
  • The AAWS has extensive contributions from program partners and key funding and leadership from the Australian Government.
  • The next phase of the AAWS will see a greater focus on ensuring that proposed benefits can be tracked and achieved.
  • Many changes will have immediate impact, but some benefits may not be realised for years or decades

The AAWS is a unique response to the challenges of managing, protecting and improving the welfare of animals. Unlike other national and multinational strategies, the Australian approach aims to deliver improvements for all animals. This strategy is not restricted to the livestock and production industries, but recognises that there is a need to address welfare issues across all animal use sectors. It also acknowledges the importance of broad engagement with industry, governments, professional associations, researchers and welfare organisations to obtain a range of perspectives, to accurately assess current and emerging issues and priorities, and to develop robust solutions.

The strategy must work within the constraints of Australia’s system of government and a very busy operating environment. Implementation of the strategy is a shared responsibility, which relies on the commitment of time, resources and funding from stakeholders across all sectors and from all levels of government. The state and territory government retain front-line responsibility for animal welfare policies and approaches, and must continue to be key partners, collaborators and contributors in the implementation of the AAWS. The Australian Government plays a leadership and coordination role, and supports the strategy with funding of approximately $1 million per year. This seed funding will leverage additional contributions to the strategy, with an estimated ratio of 1:1.2.

The AAWS and its collaborative structures have created many opportunities to share knowledge and debate how the welfare of animals can be improved across all sectors. There is a commitment to diversity of stakeholder representation, to ensure an equitable balance between industry, community welfare groups and government.

The initial phase of the implementation of the strategy (2005–09) has provided a solid foundation. The next phase (2010–14) will build on achievements to date and see further maturing and refinement of the program. In 2008–09, the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry commissioned an external review of the strategy, which found that generally reasonable progress had been made against the National Implementation Plan and that there was a high level of support and commitment from stakeholders. Predictably, some areas were more difficult and slower than others, and the reviewer made a number of recommendations for improvements in program design, implementation and administration.

This version of the AAWS is based on the recommendations of the review. Extensive consultation has been conducted with the states and territories and key stakeholders from industry, animal welfare and related organisations across the range of animal uses.

With an overall mission to achieve sustainable improvements in the welfare of animals, the strategy is based around four goals, each with three supporting objectives:

  1. Animals: The welfare needs of animals are understood and met.
    1. Monitor trends.
    2. Act on key issues.
    3. Deliver improvements.
  2. National systems: National systems deliver consistent animal welfare outcomes and give priority to ongoing improvements.
    1. Understand drivers, impediments and opportunities.
    2. Cooperate for consistency
    3. Collaborate for efficiency.
  3. People: People make ethical decisions regarding animal welfare, supported by knowledge and skills.
    1. Engage stakeholders.
    2. Inform the community.
    3. Create, use and share knowledge.
  4. International: Australia is actively engaged in international partnerships and developments to improve animal welfare.
    1. Articulate Australia’s perspective.
    2. Collaborate internationally.
    3. Learn from international experience.

With the maturing of the program comes a greater focus on ensuring that proposed benefits can be tracked and achieved. The outputs–outcomes– benefits approach allows a clear view of how the activities funded or supported by the AAWS will lead to change. A separate National Implementation Plan (Part 2 of this document) has been prepared to provide additional detail on key activities for the four years to June 2014. This approach is consistent with Australian Government guidelines for improved delivery of projects and programs.

Although many changes will have immediate impact, some may not be realised for years or decades. The delivery of some benefits will require generational change.

Scope

Key points:

  • The AAWS builds on current institutional arrangements.
  • The AAWS embraces a broad vision for the humane treatment of all sentient animals.
  • Decisions made by people have the greatest influence on an animal’s welfare.

The focus of the AAWS is the health and welfare needs of animals and their interactions with humans. The people who own, care for or have other management responsibilities for an animal have the greatest influence on its welfare. Decisions are guided by the person’s personal knowledge, skills, experience, understanding, outlook, philosophy, particular environment and economic situation, and the legislative frameworks under which they operate. The strategy reflects the high regard that Australians have for the value, care and wellbeing of animals.

The AAWS covers all Australian animals and all segments of the community, so the range of issues that need to be considered and acted on is very broad. To assist with the process, six categories of animal use or management have been identified. Each has an assigned working group that involves a range of stakeholders to identify, prioritise and manage activities. The six working groups are:

  • animals used in research and teaching
  • livestock and production animals
  • companion animals
  • aquatic animals
  • animals used for work, recreation, entertainment and display
  • native, introduced and feral animals.

The strategy has also identified three areas—research and development, education and training, and communications—that cross the boundaries of the animal sectors and require specific attention and investment. Three working groups have been established to address these areas.

The AAWS aims to help build partnerships, improve coordination, reduce duplication of effort and deliver a more effective and consistent national approach to improving the welfare of animals. There is now a greater understanding between stakeholders, recognition of differences in approaches, and understanding of timeframes for delivering improved animal welfare. Stakeholders have agreed that they need to negotiate on the practical implementation of any new animal welfare policies and practices. Behavioural change does not occur quickly, but achievements to date have provided a solid foundation for the future.

The strategy does not examine the ethics of the use of animals by humans. It aims to ensure that welfare is properly considered in any use of animals and especially that suffering is minimised, if not avoided.

The strategy will also be relevant to, and seek linkages with, a range of other national programs and structures, including the Australian Pest Animal Strategy, the Australian Framework for Landcare, natural resource management boards and catchment management authorities, the National Training Framework and the Primary Industries Education Foundation.

Case study:

Aquatic Animals

Over the last decade, there has been an increasing national and international interest in the welfare of aquatic animals. Do fish feel pain and if they do, how does this affect their productivity? The AAWS Aquatic Animals Working Group’s first priority has been to provide industry and recreational fishers with a set of scientifically-backed welfare guidelines.

The Aquatic Animal Welfare Guidelines have drawn specific attention to pain receptor studies in fish. Currently science cannot definitively say if fish feel pain. One argument suggests if fish are to experience pain in a similar way to humans they would require higher conscious processing, therefore this level of pain perception is unlikely. However alternative behavioural studies have demonstrated behavioural changes when fish are exposed to aversive stimuli.

While the jury might be out on whether fish feel pain, stress in fish has been linked to increased susceptibility to disease, repressed growth rates and poor eating quality. Therefore the adoption of recommended welfare practices, like reducing crowding pre-harvest, may produce healthier and tastier fish. The adoption of the working group’s welfare guidelines may help the seafood sector maintain existing markets and create access to new ones as consumers take increasing interest in how their food is produced.

Goals and objectives

Key points:

  • The goals of the AAWS focus on animals, national systems, people and the international scene.
  • The mission of the AAWS is to deliver sustainable improvements in the welfare of all Australian animals.

Goal 1: Animals

The welfare needs of animals are understood and met.

The primary aim of the AAWS is to deliver measurable improvements in welfare outcomes for Australia’s animals, and this is the key focus of Goal 1. This goal relies on sectoral groups being able to identify and take action to address priority animal welfare issues, risks and opportunities. It highlights the need for a solid information base covering current and emerging animal welfare issues, investments in understanding what is meant by animal welfare outcomes, and monitoring and evaluation of the results and impacts of activities under the AAWS.

Objectives

1. Monitor trends.

Ongoing strategic analysis to:

  • understand the current state of, and changes in, scientific findings and community expectations regarding animal welfare
  • identify emerging challenges and opportunities
  • prioritise actions
  • inform research, extension, legislation, co-regulation, enforcement, communication and education activities.

2. Act on key issues.

  • Coordinated efforts between program partners to address key animal welfare issues by sector.

3. Deliver improvements.

  • Identification of existing resources and structures, and of actions to address gaps, to drive delivery of sustainable improvements in animal welfare.

Goal 2: National systems

National systems deliver consistent animal welfare outcomes and give priority to ongoing improvements.

Australia is a federation of six states and two territories and, under the Australian Constitution, the states and territories have responsibility for establishing and enforcing animal welfare laws. Historical differences and different legislative and institutional arrangements have led to inconsistencies in animal welfare requirements in different parts of the country. Governments and the animal sectors have acknowledged that these inconsistencies are undesirable. This goal focuses on the development and implementation of systems, tools and processes to ensure that regulatory and co-regulatory arrangements in different jurisdictions require an agreed minimum level of animal welfare.

Objectives

4. Understand drivers, impediments and opportunities.

  • Ongoing assessment and reporting of the Australian animal welfare system, including capacity, policies and programs.

5. Cooperate for consistency.

  • Development, implementation and adoption of national products (standards and guidelines, codes, position statements).

6. Collaborate for efficiency.

  • Commitment from all program partners to maximise progress and achieve national consistency.

Goal 3: People

People make ethical decision regarding animal welfare, supported by knowledge and skills.

The delivery of sustainable improvements in the welfare of animals will depend on successful engagement with people, and development and delivery of balanced information about animal welfare issues and approaches to support decision making. Key program partners include the individuals and organisations that represent the owners, carers and managers of animals; people who provide information, advice and education to others on animal issues; developers and implementers of policies and legislation; and organisations providing information to consumers of animal products and services. This goal aims to build a platform for improving knowledge and understanding, and translating that knowledge into the actions and behaviours that will improve the welfare of animals.

Objectives

7. Engage stakeholders.

  • Engagement of stakeholders and development of strategic organisational linkages to ensure that the AAWS appropriately considers and addresses the diversity of community views and has a strong network of partners to support delivery of the program goals.

8. Inform the community.

  • Implementation of a strategic communication program for Australian and international communities to raise awareness and understanding of animal welfare issues, the activities under the AAWS and improvements achieved in animal welfare.

9. Create, use and share knowledge.

  • Development of animal welfare capacity and capability in Australia through investments in research and development, extension, and education and training.

Goal 4: International

Australia is actively engaged in international partnerships and developments to improve animal welfare.

The AAWS is Australia’s response to the challenges of animal welfare and the changing expectations and awareness of the Australian and international communities. It is unique in its scope and reach across all animal sectors.

A range of national and multinational responses have been made to the challenge of improving the welfare of animals. This goal recognises that Australia does, and should, participate as a member and leader of many international forums, and that proactive participation can deliver significant benefits. Participation includes consolidating Australia’s reputation and trading position as a country with high animal welfare standards, a commitment to continuous improvement and a willingness to share our experiences to assist other countries. International participation also helps Australia to understand, equal or exceed the levels of animal welfare being delivered in other countries.

Australia’s international partnerships have a range of purposes: science and research, trade and commerce, country relationships, collaborative alliances, capacity building, technical cooperation and information exchange. AAWS stakeholders have significant opportunities to build international networks of influence, strengthening Australia’s animal welfare reputation and position, and improving animal welfare in Australia and overseas.

Objectives

10. Articulate Australia’s perspective.

  • International recognition of Australia’s approaches to, and expertise in, animal welfare.

11. Collaborate internationally.

  • Appropriate application of Australia’s expertise and resources to international animal welfare activities.

12. Learn from international experience.

  • Active international application and sharing of experience and expertise to improve the welfare of animals.

Case study:

Animals in the wild working group

A set of unique challenges face the Animals in the Wild Working Group. The emotive and highprofile issue of reducing feral animal populations can be thorny and require complex solutions, or even the development of new technologies, that compliment animal welfare ideals

The working group—made up of government departments, universities, animal advocates, pest control and sustainable use groups, animal holding and care groups—have tackled such logistical problems head on, identifying all practical issues and the intended methodology to overcome them.

An example of this includes a goal to reduce feral camel numbers, standing at over one million, to a herd of 350,000 by developing standards for mustering, long-haul truck transport, commercial slaughter and aerial shooting.

While diverse in opinion and their involvement with wild animals, the group operates with the mutual understanding that whether animals are killed, conserved or relocated, they must be treated as humanely as possible.

This group has helped harmonise welfare legislation between the jurisdictions and developed the feral animal control Codes of Practice and Standard Operating Procedures. It has also developed a protocol to rank the humaneness of killing techniques and commissioned a study into the factors leading to success or failure of translocation programs for native animals.

Benefits

Key points:

  • Benefits are the measurable improvements that result from programs.
  • Four high-level benefits have been identified for the AAWS for 2010–14.

Benefits are the measurable improvements that result from program activities. Benefits statements are critical for monitoring and evaluating program performance, as they outline a set of expectations that can be assessed against outcomes.

Qualitative benefits recognised from the foundation phase of the AAWS include:

  • national agreement, through the Primary Industries Ministerial Council, of the importance of animal welfare and the scope of the AAWS in setting national goals and objectives for Australia
  • development of a network of engaged key stakeholders, with diverse affiliations, across the sectoral and cross-sectoral working groups
  • a managed program to engage and exchange ideas and to reach consensus on key priorities and activities
  • international recognition of Australia’s leadership in animal welfare as a result of the AAWS.

The AAWS is a national ‘umbrella’ strategy. It does not operate at the level of individual animal managers and carers. Furthermore, the diversity of animal welfare views and stakeholder positions means that perceptions about the benefits derived from the investment of money and resources under the strategy will also differ.

Four broad, high-level benefits have been identified for the second phase of the AAWS (2010–14):

1. Benefits for animals. As a result of achieving the AAWS outcome that activities lead to positive change in the welfare of animals

  • the benefit is that animals have greater wellbeing through improved levels of care and management.

2. Benefits for Australia’s animal welfare system. As a result of achieving the AAWS outcome that streamlined, efficient, transparent and successful processes are developed to deliver nationally consistent animal welfare outcomes

  • the benefit is that there is improved effectiveness and efficiency in processes and the application of resources to develop and implement animal welfare policies and systems.

3. Benefits for Australians. As a result of achieving the AAWS outcome that the strategy provides a basis for engagement and education of diverse stakeholder groups and interests

  • the benefit is that the community engages in balanced, informed debate about animal welfare issues.

4. Benefits from international efforts. As a result of achieving the AAWS outcome that Australia assists the development and delivery of improved animal welfare outcomes regionally and globally

  • the benefit is that Australia’s systems, expertise and reputation are enhanced through active engagement and partnerships.

To demonstrate that benefits have been achieved, effective measures, benchmarks and monitoring systems will need to be established and agreed through the AAWS expert working groups and Advisory Committee. Data will need to be collected and analysed using appropriate measures that are easy to understand and use and that are reliable, comparable and verifiable. Information needs to be collected frequently enough to track progress.

The next major review of the AAWS is expected in 2013–14.

Coordination and governance

Key points:

  • The Primary Industries Ministerial Council provides a mechanism for reaching national agreement on the AAWS and its implementation.
  • The Animal Welfare Unit of the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry coordinates the AAWS.

The AAWS has been established and is coordinated by the Australian Government on behalf of the strategy’s stakeholders and the broader community. Overall management and responsibility for implementation rests with the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry. The department is also the key agency representing the Australian Government on animal welfare matters internationally.

Key oversight for the strategy is provided by a highlevel, expert-based Advisory Committee, which delivers advice to the Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry on animal welfare issues of strategic and national importance; makes recommendations on expenditure of Australian Government funds in the implementation of the strategy; and assists the department in setting the overall direction for the strategy, establishing priorities and creating work plans.

The AAWS also has a governance and reporting pathway through the Animal Welfare Committee, under the Primary Industries Standing Committee to the Primary Industries Ministerial Council. To ensure national agreement and the involvement of all government jurisdictions, the ministerial council endorses the strategy and its work plans. The Animal Welfare Committee coordinates the involvement of government partners in the strategy and provides specific advice on policy, funding and legislative actions to achieve nationally consistent outcomes.

The Australian Government provides funding of approximately $1 million per year to support the implementation of the strategy. Expenditure of these funds will be in accordance with annual work plans that outline key activities and projects.

The Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry is responsible for approving expenditure of Australian Government funds.

Coordination of the strategy is provided by the Animal Welfare Unit of the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry.

Six technical working groups have been established, corresponding to the six identified categories of animal use, to provide a forum for discussion of the specific needs of animals, develop action plans and generate technical advice on the opportunities, impediments and drivers for each sector. Each group has representation from government, industry and sector specialist organisations, as well as animal welfare organisations.

Three cross-sectoral working groups have also been established to harness specific expertise and focus activity on general issues of communications, research and development, and education and training.

Case study:

Australian input sought on international Codes of Practice for use of animals in research and teaching

Initiated by our scientific community, The Australian Code of Practice for the Care and Use of Animals for Scientific Purposes (the Code) governs any use of vertebrate and cephalopod animals used for research, teaching or product testing in medicine, biology, agriculture, veterinary, environmental or animal sciences. The Code sets the standards and requirements to conduct these activities ethically across all AAWS sectors and emphasises the responsibilities of all involved to achieve the best possible welfare for the animals whilst still achieving innovative scientific outcomes.

Worldwide recognition of the Code has lead the International Council on Laboratory Animal Science and the Council of International Organisations for Medical Science to seek Australian representation for the Council’s Working Groups and has influenced the development of comparable documents, for example in New Zealand and Singapore. The Guidelines to Promote the Wellbeing of Animals was published in 2008 to support the Code and has also been widely endorsed as an international benchmark.

The participation of animal welfare and community representatives in the ethical review and monitoring procedures as well as public consultations as part of the revision process facilitates an awareness and broad consideration of animal welfare issues in this sector.

Figure 1: AAWS governance structure

this is an image of the National policy and endorsement plan showing directional flow between various business partners.

[expand all]

Part 2: National Implementation Plan

This section focuses on the activities, resources and changes needed to create positive animal welfare environments. The National Implementation Plan describes target timeframes, expected benefits and measures of success to enable effective program management and monitoring.

The plan provides an outline of how the Australian Animal Welfare Strategy (AAWS) will be undertaken over the period 2010–14. It is based on the Guide to preparing implementation plans of the Cabinet Implementation Unit4, using a program logic approach5. This approach recognises the interdependencies of the range of AAWS activities. It also reflects the inherent time lags between AAWS activities, and the achievement of outcomes that depend on action outside the control of the strategy, such as passage of legislation.

Introduction

The National Implementation Plan for the AAWS outlines the collective efforts for 2010–14 across the six animal sectors and cross-sectoral functional areas (communications, education and training, and research and development). It was developed in consultation with the AAWS Advisory Committee and working groups, the Animal Welfare Committee and other stakeholders.

The plan outlines how the vision and expectations of the strategy will be turned into actions and deliverables. It provides a framework and timescale for coordinated activities, investment decisions and engagement. It also highlights potential risks and assumptions about the system, commitments, available resources, and the progression from outputs to outcomes and benefits.

Implementation of the strategy is a shared responsibility, which relies on the commitment of time, resources and funding from stakeholders across all sectors and from all levels of government. In particular, the strategy will look to the state and territory governments, who are responsible for developing, implementing and enforcing animal welfare policies and legislation in their jurisdictions, to articulate how their current and proposed activities are consistent with the strategy and can support its goals and objectives.

The AAWS initiative is a national change program that aims to deliver sustainable improvements in welfare for all Australian animals. Animal welfare is of social and strategic importance. Modern societies have expectations that the quality of life should improve for domestic, livestock, working and wild animals. As custodians and caretakers, we have a duty of care to ensure that the welfare of animals is maintained and protected, and practices that have welfare implications must continue to evolve as society’s knowledge and expectations change.

The Australian Government has committed approximately $4 million to phase 2 of the AAWS. This funding will be used for specific joint initiatives to address priority issues at industry, sectoral and national levels. Co-contributions to activities under the strategy will continue to be sought from governments and other stakeholders.

Case study:

National standards for zoo animals

Unlike livestock industries which have been covered by animal welfare Codes of Practice for many years, there has never been an equivalent system for non-production animals such as zoo animals.

A major undertaking for the AAWS has been the development of national standards and guidelines to protect the health and welfare of animals kept for exhibition. This is a great example of the strength of this program and what can be achieved through partnership and commitment.

Challenges to face the working group included harmonising industry and government perceptions on animal welfare, and creating standards that both industry and regulators can relate to.

All stakeholders including industry, governments and animal welfare rights groups participated in the drafting of the guidelines which garnered valuable expertise and helped to better inform and unify the collective industry.

The outcomes focused guidelines will allow organisations to manage and document in a formal capacity and if implemented nationally will see exhibited animals kept to the same standards throughout Australia.

Due for completion in mid 2011, the project is expected to be referenced in state and territory legislation in 2012.

Strategic framework

Key points:

  • The vision of the AAWS is that all Australians value animals and are committed to improving their welfare.
  • The mission of the AAWS is to deliver sustainable improvements in the welfare of all animals.

Table 1 shows the framework for the AAWS.

Table 1. Australian Animal Welfare Strategy framework
AAWS goals
Animals National systems People International
1. The welfare needs of animals are understood and met. 2. National systems deliver consistent animal welfare outcomes and give priority to ongoing improvements. 3. People make ethical decisions regarding animal welfare, supported by knowledge and skills. 4. Australia is actively engaged in international partnerships and developments to improve animal welfare.
Objectives
1. Monitor trends.

2. Act on key issues.

3. Deliver improvements.

4. Understand drivers, impediments and opportunities.

5. Cooperate for consistency.

6. Collaborate for efficiency.

7. Engage stakeholders.

8. Inform the community.

9. Create, use and share knowledge.

10. Articulate Australia's perspective.

11. Collaborate internationally.

12. Learn from international experience.

Outcomes
(the intended results, impacts or consequences of actions)
Activities lead to positive change in the welfare of animals. Streamlined, efficient, transparent and successful processes are developed to deliver nationally consistent animal welfare outcomes. The strategy provides a basis for engagement and education of diverse stakeholder groups and interests. Australia assists the development and delivery of improved animal welfare outcomes regionally and globally.
Benefits
(measurable improvements resulting from an outcome, perceived as an advantage by one or more stakeholders)
Animals have greater wellbeing through improved levels of care and management. Effective and efficient processes and application of resources are used to develop and implement animal welfare policies and systems. The community engages in balanced, informed debate about animal welfare issues. Australia's systems, expertise and reputation are enhanced through active engagement and partnerships.
Performance measures
(indicators of success)
Appropriate animal welfare measures are developed and used.

Deficiencies are recognised, discussed with stakeholders and addressed.

Annual AAWS report on Australia's animal welfare system is prepared and regularly updated, and trends are analysed.

Efficiency in animal welfare activities is achieved through cooperation.

National consistency in animal welfare outcomes is achieved.

Animal welfare information is continually developed and delivered.

Attitudes, perceptions and behaviours are informed.

Participation in animal welfare education and training programs increases.

Sharing of resources between stakeholder groups increases.

Australia is rated as equivalent to or better than international benchmarks, following formal evaluations.

World Organisation for Animal Health and other international organisations continue to seek Australian expertise.

Forecast AAWS expenditure, 2010-14 (total = $4 007 000)
$1 167 913 (29%) $528 818 (13%) $1 927 269 (48%) $383 000 (10%)
Estimated additional stakeholder contributions (total = $4 530 623)
$1 718 999 $970 500 $1 476 124 $365 000

Implementation Schedule

Table 2 shows the implementation schedule for the AAWS, and Table 3 shows the budget forecast for 2010–14.

Table 2. Australian Animal Welfare Strategy implementation schedule
Timeframe Item Assumptions
20 years (goal) 1. Animals: The welfare needs of animals are understood and met. Improvements in animal welfare will be sustainable if changes are practical, feasible and realistic, and consider social, economic and environmental perspectives.
10 years (outcomes/ benefits) The welfare of animals is considered and managed in all decisions and activities that affect it. Animals experience better levels of care, management and wellbeing. Rate of change is linked to resources available. Coordination maximises impact of application of resources and efforts. AAWS networks provide a key to raising awareness, understanding and importance of animal welfare.
4 years (objectives) Regular internal and external reporting of progress on animal welfare outcomes and program delivery against agreed measures and benchmarks.
(Monitor trends)
Coordinated actions to address animal welfare issues, avoiding duplication of effort.
(Act on key issues)
Improved infrastructure, networks and resources to drive delivery of benefits for animals.
(Deliver improvements)
Regular reporting supports the demonstration of achievements. Infrastructure (resources, networks, etc.) is necessary to enable the translation of investments into change of practice.
Key activities Establish monitoring, performance measures and benchmarking to assess progress against priorities and to identify emerging issues. Implement projects to deliver agreed activities and outputs. Implement review recommendations and establish enhanced arrangements for program management. Assess and improve AAWS stakeholder networks and understand their contributions to AAWS goals.

Put in place informed strategies for sectors to secure resources for their work.

Use seed funding to establish education and extension networks.

Australian Government continues to maintain AAWS funding. States, territories and private sector provide enhanced cash contribution and in-kind contributions.
Highest perceived risk Measures are inadequate to demonstrate benefits from the AAWS investment. Practices that result in poor welfare may continue due to a lack of national agreement on what constitutes positive welfare and how to measure it. Insufficient resources are available for the development, implementation and enforcement of national standards, especially for nonproduction sectors. Jurisdictional budgets are reduced, limiting contributions by state and territory governments to the AAWS. Investment in resources and operational funds by governments and the private sector are adequate to deliver the AAWS goals and agreed activities.
Foundation activities Sectoral stock takes and gap analysis; priorities identified. Sectoral and cross-sectoral action plans established. AAWS Advisory Committee and working groups established. An Advisory Committee provides governance, and subordinate working groups provide expertise, stakeholder con nection and point of reference.
Resources required Sectoral working groups to monitor developments, set measures and benchmarks. AAWS working groups, AAWS Advisory Committee, Animal Welfare Committee and other nongovernment organisations. Industry quality assurance, inspectors, compliance resources, educators, training materials, Animal Welfare Committee regulators. DAFF will continue to provide national leader ship, coordination and seed funding to maintain momentum.

This table shows the implementation schedule for the AAWS
Objective 1 Objective 2 Objective 3 Goal 1 total
AAWSa Otherb Total AAWSa Otherb Total AAWSa Otherb Total AAWSa Otherb Total
2010-11 $30 000 $30 000 $190 257 $322 355 $512 612 $55 000 $55 000 $110 000 $275257 $377 355 $652 612
2011-12 $40 000 $40 000 $207 656 $426 645 $634300 $25 000 $25 000 $50 000 $272 656 $451 644 $724 300
2012-13 $60 000 $60 000 $200 000 $420 000 $620 000 $25 000 $25 000 $50 000 $285 000 $445 000 $730 000
2013-14 $110 000 $110 000 $200 000 $420 000 $620 000 $25 000 $25 000 $50 000 $335 000 $445 000 $780 000
Total $240 000 $240,000 $797 913 $1 588 999 $2 386 912 $130 000 $130 000 $260 000 $1 167 913 $1 718 999 $2 886 912

This table shows the implementation schedule for the AAWS
Timeframe Item Assumptions
20 years (goal) 2. National systems: National systems deliver consistent animal welfare outcomes and give priority to ongoing improvements. Differences between states and territories slow delivery of national improvements and do not support consistent application of best practices.
10 years (outcomes/ benefits) Roles and responsibilities in the delivery of consistent animal welfare outcomes are clearly defined and accepted.

Efficient processes and application of resources are used to develop and implement animal welfare policies and systems.

Clear roles and responsibilities make it possible to see where to influence the system and engage appropriate personnel.
4 years (objectives) Ongoing assessment and reporting of the Australian animal welfare system, including capacity, policies and programs.
(Understand drivers, impediments and opportunities)
Development and adoption of national products (standards and guidelines, codes, position statements).
(Cooperate for consistency)
National collaboration to maximise progress and achieve greater consistency.
(Collaborate for efficiency)
Assessing the system will show gaps and opportunities for intervention and investment. National products will define acceptable standards and provide guidance on best practice.
Key activities Complete and analyse AWC report on Australia's animal welfare system and capacity. AWPIT/PISC/PIMC consider analysis report.

Identify and analyse reports by other organisations on the animal welfare system.

Governments complete and regulate a range of national standards and guidelines. Industry adopts codes of practice. AAWS stakeholders coordinate their engagement in the revision of the Australian code for the care and use of animals for scientific purposes.

Progress guidelines on ethical decision making for use of animals in research and teaching.

Reach consensus during the development and endorsement of national products to streamline implementation and enforcement. Implement improved cross-jurisdictional arrangements. Finalise Australian Cross Jurisdictional Animal Welfare Incident Response Plan. Develop improved arrangements for dealing with animals in natural disasters. Stakeholders engage and reach consensus on the national outputs.

There are sufficient public and private sector resources to meet the project timetables. Co-regulation supports delivery and enforcement of agreed national standards.

Highest perceived risks Reporting agencies do not deliver information within agreed timeframes.

AAWS activities are undertaken without full understanding of the operating environment.

Stakeholders lose confidence in national processes and disengage.

Networks fail to adequately identify interested parties and experts.

Cost of the standards and guidelines process becomes prohibitive.

The communications program fails in implementation phase.

State and territory governments vary or fail to implement agreed PIMC decisions.

State and territory reductions in funding limit involvement. States and territories fail to adequately resource compliance activities. Uptake and drivers for co-regulatory quality assurance programs are lacking.

Deviation from agreed national process undermines stakeholder confidence.
Foundation activities Sectoral and cross-sectoral stocktakes. AHA performance measures for the animal health system. Standards and guidelines business plan pathway for national endorsement of nonproduction animal standards. Agreement by ministers on consistency framework. Standards and guidelines approach remains valid.
Resources required Agreed reporting framework and process through AAWS Advisory Committee and AWC. Engaged, expert writing groups. Specialist input for consultation processes and analysis. Engagement of AWC. Involvement of jurisdictions. Broader resources can be harnessed to support the delivery of the AAWS. DAFF provides national leadership and coordination.

Objective 4 Objective 5 Objective 6 Goal 2 total
AAWSa Otherb Total AAWSa Otherb Total AAWSa Otherb Total AAWSa Otherb Total
2010-11 $45 000 - $45 000 $86 318 $248 000 $334 318 $22 500 $22 500 $45 000 $153 818 $270 500 $424 318
2011-12 - - - $100 000 $200 000 $300 000 - - - $100 000 $200 000 $300 000
2012-13 $25 000 - $25 000 $150 000 $300 000 $450 000 - - - $175 000 $300 000 $475 000
2013-14 - - - $100 000 $200 000 $300 000 - - - $100 000 $200 000 $300 000
Total $70 000 - $70 000 $436 318 $948 000 $1 384 318 $22 500 $22 500 $45000 $528 818 $970 500 $1 499 318

Timeframe Item Assumptions
20 years (goal) 3. People: People make ethical decisions regarding animal welfare, supported by knowledge and skills. The delivery of sustainable and ongoing improvements in animal welfare will rely on people implementing better practices. People can be empowered to change by improving their knowledge and understanding, and this can be done in various ways, from provision of information through to practical training.
10 years (outcomes/ benefits) People actively fulfil their animal welfare obligations and are assisted to make evidence-based decisions.

The AAWS provides a basis for engaging diverse stakeholder groups and interests.

People provided with balanced information will make better decisions.
4 years (objectives) 7. Stakeholder engagement and strong networks.
(Engage stakeholders)
8. Strategic communications to raise awareness and understanding.
(Inform the community)
9. Capacity and capability building through research, extension, education and training.
(Create, use and share knowledge)
AAWS participants will be equipped to promote animal welfare messages and to do so proactively. This promotion will generally raise awareness and understanding of animal welfare issues.
Key activities Confirm working group operations, membership and terms of reference. Actively engage, formally and informally, with AAWS participants and stakeholder networks. Establish and make operational the AAWS website. Implement AAWS communication tactical plan. Deliver communication partnership projects. Develop and begin a collaborative research program for national research needs of highest priority. Invest in research projects that build understanding of issues. Deliver education projects that enhance animal welfare capabilities. Improved access to general, factual information is important.

Information alone is not enough to drive change.

The AAWS can deliver balanced information on the welfare of animals.

National communication and extension materials will be developed and used.

Highest perceived risk Community, media, retailers form their views on animal welfare based on incomplete or inaccurate information. Failure to deliver consistent, coherent and regular communications creates doubts on program management and delivery. There is a failure to maximise opportunities through lack of coordination or lack of resources.

Funders of research and development attach a low priority to animal welfare. There is a failure to adhere to a peer-reviewed and evidence-based approach.

Diverse stakeholders will remain supportive and committed to the AAWS vision.
Foundation activities Australia's consultative processes that facilitate engagement of diverse groups and perspectives. AAWS sectoral and cross-sectoral working groups established to engage stakeholders. Annual AAWS workshops. AAWS communication strategy, tactical implementation plan and protocol documents. Background research on community and stakeholder attitudes. AAWS 08 international conference. Education and training stocktake. National animal welfare research, development and extension plans. Pain summit and publication of papers. The stocktakes provide a valuable information source to inform future priorities.
Resources Working group leadership and support (chairs, executive officers). Tools to support stakeholders. Coordinator to drive generation and delivery of content and products. Animal welfare researcher and specialists in education and extension. Specialist people can be identified and engaged to support implementation.

Objective 7 Objective 8 Objective 9 Goal 3 total
AAWSa Otherb Total AAWSa Otherb Total AAWSa Otherb Total AAWSa Otherb Total
2010-11 $100 000 $120 000 $220 000 $192 000 $139 900 $331 900 $147 925 $61 549 $209 474 $439 925 $321 449 $761 374
2011-12 $160 000 $120 000 $280 000 $213 444 $123 400 $336844 $155 9 00 $148 950 $304 850 $529 344 $392350 $921 694
2012-13 $160 000 $120 000 $280 000 $198 000 $137 500 $335 500 $103 000 $86 625 $189 625 $461 000 $344 125 $805125
2013-14 $150 000 $120 000 $270 000 $207 000 $176 000 $383 000 $140 000 $122 500 $262 500 $497 000 $418 500 $915 500
Total $570 000 $480 000 $1 050 000 $810 444 $576 800 $1 387 244 $546 825 $419 624 $966449 $1 927 269 $1 476 424 $3 403 693

Timeframe Item Assumptions
20 years (goal) 4. International: Australia is actively engaged in international partnerships and developments to improve animal welfare. Australia has to maintain its reputation as a compassionate nation that appropriately addresses animal welfare issues in an ethical manner, and this can help support trading arrangements and relationships.
10 years (outcomes/ benefits) Australia is a recognised leader in the development and delivery of animal welfare outcomes. Australia's expertise and reputation are enhanced through active engagement and partnerships. Australia's reputation for high animal welfare standards is in the national interest.
4 years (objectives) 10. International recognition of Australia's approaches and expertise.
(Articulate Australia's perspective)
11. Australia's expertise and resources appropriately applied to the progression of international animal welfare activities.
(Collaborate internationally)
12. Active application and sharing of experience and expertise to improve animal welfare internationally.
(Learn from international experience)
International engagement relies on relationships, which require participation and networking.
Key activities Provide sponsorships to support AAWS stakeholders to attend and participate in international forums and advocate for the AAWS and Australia's approaches. Provide secretariat support and coordination for the OIE RAWS— Asia, the Far East and Oceania. Implement training projects in areas of strategic significance. OIE Collaborating Centre on Animal Welfare Science and Bioethical Analysis establishes 'twinning arrangements' with international scientific institutes. Advocacy from AAWS stakeholders for Australia's approach can be powerful. International engagement can help ensure that Australian funds and human resources are appropriately applied.
Highest perceived risk Trading partners lose confidence in Australia's animal welfare credentials. Opportunities to contribute and engage are curtailed by budget restrictions. Australia is bypassed in international collaborations due to loss of expertise or loss of resources, leading to an inability to participate. International perceptions of Australia's animal welfare approach and practices affect Australia's ability to influence international negotiations and Australia's trading relationships.
Foundation activities Leadership on the Middle East Gulf Cooperation Council regional plan for animal handling and transport. RAWS—Asia, the Far East and Oceania and implementation plan.

International engagement through OIE and the Quadrilateral Alliance with the United States, Canada and New Zealand.

Technical assistance provided to the United Arab Emirates to write their animal welfare regulations.

Training delivered in the United Arab Emirates for animal welfare inspectors.

Australian expert on FAO's expert panel on capacity building for good animal welfare practices.

RAWS.
EU-Australia Cooperation Agreement on Animal Welfare finalised.

Recognition by OIE of Australia's credentials in animal welfare research with establishment of the New Zealand-Australian OIE Collaborating Centre on Animal Welfare Science and Bioethical Analysis.

The work already done provides a solid base for future engagement and activity.
Resources required Advocates of sufficient quality to warrant sponsorship. Co-contribution of funding of people. DAFF officers able to deliver secretariat functions and drive engagement. Technical resources (people and information) with respected international reputations. Specialist people and other resources can be identified and engaged to support delivery.

Objective 10 Objective 11 Objective 12 Goal 4 total
AAWSa Otherb Total AAWSa Otherb Total AAWSa Otherb Total AAWSa Otherb Total
2010-11 $20 000 $20 000 $40 000 $69 000 $88 000 $157 000 $15 000 $29 900 $44 900 $104 000 $137 900 $241 900
2011-12 $60 000 $60 000 $120 000 $9 000 $34 000 $43 000 $20 000 $13 100 $33 100 $89 000 $107 100 $196 100
2012-13 $60 000 $60 000 $120 000 $10 000 - $10 000 $20 000 - $20 000 $90 000 $60 000 $150 000
2013-14 $60 000 $60 000 $120 000 $20 000 - $20 000 $20 000 - $20 000 $100 000 $60 000 $160 000
Total $200 000 $200 000 $400 000 $108 000 $122 000 $230 000 $75 000 $43 000 $118 000 $383 000 $365 000 $748 000

AAWS — Australian Animal Welfare Strategy;

AHA — Animal Health Australia;

AWC — Animal Welfare Committee;

AWPIT — Animal Welfare Product Integrity Taskforce;

DAFF — Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry;

EU — European Union;

FAO — Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations;

OIE — World Organisation for Animal Health;

PIMC — Primary Industries Ministerial Council;

PISC — Primary Industries Standing Committee;

RAWS — Regional Animal Welfare Strategy

a) Expenditure of Australian Government funds through the AAWS administered budget

b) Estimated additional cash and in-kind contributions made to AAWS implementation (through projects and activities)

Table 3. Australian Animal Welfare Strategy budget forecast, 2010–14
2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 Total
AAWS In-kind AAWS In-kind AAWS In-kind AAWS In-kind AAWS In-kind Grand total
Administered budget $973 000 $991 000 $1 011 000 $1 032 000 $4 007 000 $8 449 624
Goal 1: Sustainable improvements in animal welfare
Obj 1: Monitor trends $30 000 - $40 000 - $60000 - $110 000 - $240 000 - $240 000
Obj 2: Act on key issues $322356 $207 656 $426 644 $200 000 $420 000 $200 000 $420 000 $797 913 $1 588 999 $2 386 912
Obj 3: Deliver improvements $55 000 $55 000 $25 000 $25 000 $25 000 $25 000 $25 000 $25 000 $130 000 $130 000 $260 000
Goal 1 subtotal $275 257 $377356 $272 656 $451 644 $285 000 $445 000 $335 000 $445000 $1 167 913 $1 718 999 $2 886 912
% of annual budget 28% 34% 28% 40% 28% 40% 32% 41% 29% 39% 34%
% of total expenditure 7% 8% 7% 10% 7% 10% 8% 10% 14% 20%
Goal 2: Enhancing national systems
Obj 4: Understand drivers, impediments and opportunities $45 000 - - - $25 000 - - - $70 000 - $70 000
Obj 5: Cooperate for consistency $86 318 $248 000 $100 000 $200,000 $150 000 $300 000 $100 000 $200 000 $436 318 $948 000 $1 384 318
Obj 6: Collaborate for efficiency $22 500 $22 500 - - - - - - $22 500 $22 500 $45 000
Goal 2 subtotal $153 818 $270 500 $100 000 $200 000 $175 000 $300 000 $100 000 $200 000 $528 818 $970 500 $1 499 318
% of annual budget 16% 24% 10% 18% 17% 27% 10% 18% 13% 22% 18%
% of total expenditure 4% 6% 2% 5% 4% 7% 2% 5% 6% 11%
Goal 3: Improved skills and understanding
Obj 7: Engage stakeholders $100 000 $120 000 $160 000 $120 000 $160 000 $120 000 $150 000 $120 000 $570 000 $480 000 $1 050 000
Obj 8: Inform the community $192 000 $139 900 $213 444 $123 400 $198 000 $137 500 $207 000 $176 000 $810 444 $576 800 $1 387244
Obj 9: Create, use and share knowledge $147 925 $61 549 $155 900 $148 950 $103 000 $86 625 $140 000 $122 500 $546 825 $419 624 $966449
Goal 3 subtotal $439 925 $321 449 $529 344 $392 350 $461 000 $344 125 $497 000 $418 500 $1 927 269 $1 476 424 $ 3 403 693
% of annual budget 45% 29% 53% 35% 46% 31% 48% 38% 48% 33% 40%
% of total expenditure 11% 7% 13% 9% 12% 8% 12% 9% 23% 17%
Goal 4: International partnerships
Obj 10: Articulate Australia's perspective $20 000 $20 000 $60 000 $60 000 $60000 $60 000 $60000 $60 000 $200 000 $200 000 $400 000
Obj 11: Collaborate internationally $69 000 $88 000 $9 000 $34 000 $10 000 - $20 000 - $108 000 $122 000 $230 000
Obj 12: Learn from international experience $15 000 $29 900 $20 000 $13 100 $20 000 - $20 000 - $75 000 $43 000 $118 000
Goal 4 subtotal $104 000 $137 900 $89 000 $107 100 $90 000 $60 000 $100 000 $60 000 $383 000 $365 000 $748 000
% of annual budget 11% 12% 9% 7% 9% 3% 10% 3% 10% 6% 8%
% of total expenditure 3°% 3% 2% 2% 2% 1% 2% 1% 5% 3%
Grand total $973 000 $1 107 205 $991 000 $1 151 094 $1 011 000 $1 149 125 $1 032 000 $1 123 500 $4 007 000 $4 530 923 $8 537 923

a) In-kind contributions are estimates only.

Monitoring, evaluation and reporting

Monitoring and evaluation is a critical part of the program management and implementation cycle. It allows for adaptive management and improvement through the life of the program to support delivery of program goals and objectives. It also supports reporting and communication of the program outputs and outcomes.

The National Implementation Plan has been developed using a program logic framework, which shows a series of consequences, not just events. It seeks to make clear the cause-and-effect relationships between activities, outputs, outcomes and benefits. The framework also identifies key indicators and lines of evidence at each level to support program performance management.

Monitoring, evaluation and reporting processes under the AAWS will cover efficiency (program management and administration), effectiveness (delivery of outputs and outcomes) and impact (change over time and contribution).

A complete monitoring, evaluation and reporting program will be developed during 2010–11.

Performance measures

Performance measures will continue to evolve as the program is implemented and the measures are tested. Initial measures have been identified for each of the goals (Table 4). A workshop of key personnel will be held in 2010–11 to test the identified benefits statements and further articulate the program’s performance measures.

Table 4. Australian Animal Welfare Strategy performance measures and evidence
Goals Goal 1: Animals Goal 2: National systems Goal 3: people Goal 4: International
Benefits Animals have greater wellbeing through improved levels of care and management. Effective and efficient processes and application of resources are used to develop and implement animal welfare policies and systems. The community engages in balanced, informed debate about animal welfare issues. Australia's systems, expertise and reputation are enhanced through active engagement and partnerships.
Performance measures
  • Appropriate animal welfare measures are developed and used.
  • Deficiencies are recognised, discussed with stakeholders and addressed.
  • Annual AAWS report on Australia's welfare system is prepared and regularly updated, and trends are analysed.
  • Efficiency in animal welfare activities is achieved through cooperation.
  • National consistency in animal welfare outcomes is achieved.
  • Animal welfare information is continually developed and delivered.
  • Attitudes, perceptions and behaviours are informed.
  • Participation in animal welfare education and training programs increases.
  • Sharing of resources between stakeholder groups increases.
  • Australia is rated as equivalent to or better than international benchmarks, such as the European Union, following formal international evaluations.
  • World Organisation for Animal Health and other international organisations continue to seek Australian expertise.
Program reporting

Program reporting is part of the governance framework and an essential component of the stakeholder engagement and communication strategies.

Governance reports will include an annual report against the approved work plan, which will be submitted to the Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry and through the Animal Welfare Committee to the Primary Industries Ministerial Council (PIMC).

Regular reports on activities, achievements and progress will also be prepared and distributed to stakeholders, and project information will be made available online through websites that are accessible to the public or to participants only. All projects funded through the AAWS will be expected to prepare a report for publication, outlining key results.

Accountability and management

The AAWS is a broad, collaborative program with a distributed decision-making framework. It needs to be accountable to:

  • the general public, because it addresses an issue of community importance and public good, and involves expenditure of public funds
  • stakeholders who are directly involved and also make contributions
  • state and territory governments, who provide support for implementation, as well as additional resources and input
  • the Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, who is responsible to the Australian Parliament for expenditure of government funds under the program.

Accountability to the general community will be delivered through progress and output reports and other communication products, which are made publicly and widely available.

As well as these reports, stakeholders will be provided with additional information and engagement opportunities through meetings and workshops, direct communication activities (such as regular newsletter updates) and access to a secure, collaborative online service.

The PIMC provides national endorsement of the strategy and the implementation plan (see Figure 1), representing the commitment of the Australian and state and territory governments to the aims of the program and delivery of its outcomes and benefits.

Progress on the implementation of the strategy will be reported to the council annually.

The council is supported in its work by the Primary Industries Standing Committee, whose endorsement of the strategy and the implementation plan provides the commitment of the departments of agriculture and primary industries to the strategy’s successful implementation and the involvement of personnel.

The standing committee receives advice on animal welfare issues from the Animal Welfare Product Integrity Taskforce, which oversees and directs the work of the national Animal Welfare Committee. The Animal Welfare Committee brings together all of the state and territory, Australian and New Zealand government agencies with responsibility for the development, implementation and regulation of animal welfare policies and standards. The annual report prepared for the ministerial council and delivered through the subcommittees will provide formal accountability for the strategy to the Council of Australian Governments framework.

Details of the relevant government committees and agencies can be found in Attachment 1.

The Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry has specific responsibilities with regard to approving expenditure of Australian Government funds through the strategy. Specific accountability provisions will apply to ensure that the minister has sufficient information to support decisions and to be assured that the expenditures are appropriate and well managed and achieve results. The minister will be provided with reports and briefings, in person and in writing, from the Advisory Committee and the department on animal welfare issues, recommendations for expenditures, and implementation of the strategy, its progress and its outputs.

Management and administration

The implementation of the strategy will be coordinated by the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF) on behalf of the stakeholders. The department is responsible for ensuring that expenditure of Australian Government funds is efficient and effective, in line with the approved aims and objectives of the strategy and in accordance with the requirements of the Australian Government. It will manage the administration of grants funded through the program and the purchase of goods and services.

Consistent with the department’s project management approach, the departmental General Manager with responsibility for animal welfare will be the project sponsor. The sponsor will be accountable for the success of the strategy. Their role includes championing the strategy within the department, ensuring that resources are provided, removing obstacles the program managers cannot remove on their own and taking recommendations for improvement to the Advisory Committee, the national Animal Welfare Committee, the department’s senior executive and the minister.

As program manager, the department will be accountable for implementation of the strategy, ensure a suitably qualified and sufficiently resourced team is available to manage activities, provide direction and oversight to projects, develop recommendations for improvement and liaise between the strategy’s sponsor, Advisory Committee and stakeholders.

The department will develop an annual work and expenditure plan for the program, in conjunction with the Advisory Committee, the national Animal Welfare Committee and the strategy’s sectoral and cross-sectoral working groups. The work plan will be submitted to the minister for approval of expenditure of Australian Government funds and to the PIMC for national endorsement. The department also has responsibility for monitoring and evaluating progress and for producing an annual report against the approved work plan.

The Advisory Committee has responsibility for providing oversight for the strategy, setting its broad direction, making recommendations regarding projects and resources, and delivering advice to the minister and the department on current and emerging issues of significance. Terms of reference and engagement for the Advisory Committee are provided at Attachment 2.

The Advisory Committee sets the terms of reference for the sectoral and cross-sectoral working groups and endorses the identified priorities and projects as being consistent with the strategy’s overall goals and objectives. The Advisory Committee will work closely with the department and the national Animal Welfare Committee. The Chair of the Animal Welfare Committee is a member of the strategy Advisory Committee, and the Chair of the Advisory Committee is a member of the Animal Welfare Committee.

The chair of the Advisory Committee will be the spokesperson for the program.

The expert sectoral and cross-sectoral working groups are technical reference panels that are responsible for assessing the program’s goals and objectives at an operational and sectoral level to develop action plans and undertake projects. Terms of reference for the working groups are provided at Attachment 3.

The members of the working groups connect the AAWS with its external networks. They are expected to promote animal welfare and the strategy, provide advice on current and emerging issues, and deliver feedback to the Advisory Committee and department on implementation. They are also expected to identify opportunities for, and secure, co-contributions to activities and projects to assist delivery of the program’s goals.

Risk management

The implementation schedule identifies a number of risks that could affect the delivery of the strategy’s goals and objectives. These risks have been assessed using a standard risk assessment framework (Table 5) to highlight those with the greatest likelihood and greatest impact. The results are shown in Table 6.

Table 5. Risk assessment framework

Low likelihood, high impact

Medium likelihood, high impact

High likelihood, high impact

Low likelihood, medium impact

Medium likelihood, medium impact

High likelihood, medium impact

Low likelihood, low impact

Medium likelihood, low impact

High likelihood, low impact


Table 6. Assessment of identified risks
Objective 1: Monitor trends

Measures are inadequate to demonstrate benefits from the AAWS investment.

Objective 2: Act on key issues

Practices that result in poor welfare may continue due to a lack of national agreement on what constitutes positive welfare and how to measure it.

Objective 3: Deliver improvements

Insufficient resources are available for the development, implementation and enforcement of national standards, especially for nonproduction sectors.

Assumptions

There is adequate investment in resources and operational funds by governments and private sector to deliver the AAWS goals and agreed activities.

Objective 4: Understand drivers, impediments and opportunities

AAWS activities are undertaken without full understanding of the operating environment.

Objective 5: Cooperate for consistency

Stakeholders lose confidence in national processes and disengage.

Objective 6: Collaborate for efficiency

State and territory governments vary agreed Primary Industries Ministerial Council decisions.

Assumptions

Deviation from agreed national process undermines stakeholder confidence.

Objective 7: Engage stakeholders

Community, media, retailers form their views on animal welfare based on incomplete or inaccurate information.

Objective 8: Inform the community

Failure to deliver consistent, coherent and regular communications creates doubts on program management and delivery.

Objective 9: Create, use and share knowledge

There is a failure to maximise opportunities through lack of coordination or lack of resources.

Funders of research and development attach a low priority to animal welfare.

There is a failure to adhere to a peer-reviewed and evidence-based approach.

Assumptions

Diverse stakeholders will remain supportive and committed to the AAWS vision.

Objective 10: Articulate Australia's perspective

Trading partners lose confidence in Australia's animal welfare credentials (risk could be higher impact if welfare becomes a requirement for trade).

Objective 11: Collaborate internationally

Opportunities to contribute and engage are curtailed by budget restrictions (depends on state/territory and Australian Government departmental budget allocations).

Objective 12: Learn from international experience

Australia is bypassed in international collaborations due to loss of expertise or loss of resources, leading to an inability to participate (risk could be higher impact if welfare becomes a trade requirement).

Assumptions

International perceptions of Australia's animal welfare approach and practices affect Australia's ability to influence international negotiations and Australia's trading relationships.

Risk management strategies

Risk management for the strategy is overseen by the Advisory Committee, PIMC arrangements and DAFF.

The implementation framework developed for phase 2 is very clear about expectations and outputs. Regular reporting will improve transparency and accountability, increasing the likelihood that problems or concerns will be identified early and appropriate corrective action taken.

As an investment of Australian Government funds, the program is subject to the Australian Government risk management framework for program administration. The department’s risk management requirements apply.

International developments will be monitored through engagement of AAWS stakeholders and the Australian Government with the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and their participation in a range of international forums on animal welfare.

Specific management strategies for the highest risks identified above are outlined in Table 7.

Table 7. Management strategies for highest risks
Risk Basis for risk assessment Management strategies
Goal 1: Animals

Practices that result in poor welfare may continue due to a lack of national agreement on what constitutes positive welfare and how to measure it.

Perceptions of what constitutes good welfare in isolation of other considerations can lead to decisions by emotion and media response rather than evidence.

Lack of measures and resources for monitoring compliance limits capacity to enforce agreed changes.

Focus on evidence-based decision making and provide appropriate levels of balanced information on issues of contention or concern.

Invest in research and development to build an evidence base, which will become accessible through communication channels.

Goal 2: National systems

State and territory governments vary agreed Primary Industries Ministerial Council decisions, which undermines confidence and trust in the process, causing key stakeholders to disengage.

Agreements at the national level follow extensive consultation with stakeholders and build expectations about implementation and delivery. Variation at a state/territory level without equivalent stakeholder consultation can create distrust. Implement Primary Industries Ministerial Council agreed consistency framework.

Explore development of more formal mechanisms for better understanding of roles and responsibilities.

Improve management of stakeholder expectations through information on the limitations of national agreements.

Goal 3: People

Community, media, retailers form their views on animal welfare based on incomplete or inaccurate information.

Much of the community and city-based consumers are unaware of animal welfare issues first hand and have limited perspectives on complex issues. Develop and distribute information from the strategy that is balanced and based on contemporary evidence and expertise.

Use experts to develop position statements on complex issues. Implement the communication strategy and ensure broad access for the general community.

Goal 4: International

International perceptions of Australia's animal welfare approach and practices affect Australia's ability to influence international negotiations and Australia's trading relationships.

Current relationships and Australia's reputation could falter due to poor ratings in external audits or adverse media around particular practices, resulting in loss of markets and trading opportunities. Provide information on Australia's approaches for strategic positioning.

Build relationships for technical and policy exchange and research partnerships, including assisting with and providing leadership for regional animal welfare strategies.

Work proactively within the international community for recognition of equivalence in delivery of welfare outcomes through Australia's practices and procedures.

Stakeholder management

Detailed analysis undertaken for phase 1 of the AAWS identified more than 400 stakeholder organisations for the strategy, covering governments; advisory bodies; education, research and training organisations; Indigenous communities; industry and business; nongovernment organisations; and the veterinary and animal health sectors. Most Australians are involved in using animals directly or indirectly.

If the strategy is to deliver measurable differences in welfare outcomes for Australian animals, it will need to be accessible to all Australians and influence the behaviour of many. Limited funding means that large-scale information or awareness campaigns are not feasible, nor are investments in direct programs to change practices at an industry or sectoral level (for example, industry adjustment packages or subsidies).

However, the strategy’s projects, seminars, workshops, conference, committees, and working and writing groups have already engaged hundreds of people in implementing the strategy. Through their personal and professional networks, participants reach many more people and connect into other networks, creating a critical mass of animal welfare advocates driving positive change. The program has developed significant social capital and goodwill to date, and phase 2 will aim to harness this to leverage outcomes.

Good stakeholder management requires, and is supported by, a solid communications strategy, but stakeholder management extends beyond providing information and developing products. Communications approaches can help to keep participants up to date with developments, informed of activities and engaged with the common vision. But the AAWS will also need to influence, empower and enable stakeholders to take action that supports and is consistent with the goals and objectives. This requires clear statements of roles, responsibilities and expectations. Tools and resources that assist and support stakeholder action will be developed and implemented, including online collaborative spaces that facilitate discussion, reporting of progress and delivery of program outcomes.

The working group structure provides a solid platform for stakeholder engagement and coordinated action to address key animal welfare issues at practical levels. The funds available through the Australian Government will provide necessary impetus to drive projects that address strategy priorities.

To operate effectively, each of the working groups needs to have clear priorities expressed in an action plan aligned with the overall strategy and must be able to engage in robust discussion. Although it is expected that most working group activity will occur through email, online collaboration and teleconferences, meetings of the working groups are also needed, at least annually. These meetings will assist the groups to build motivation for the strategy and its aims, cement relationships and networks, and gain a richer understanding of the different perspectives. Funding from the Australian Government will be used to support these meetings, including covering participants’ travel costs, except for representatives of government agencies (whose costs will be covered by their jurisdictional agency, in line with convention and as part of the general contribution from governments to the strategy).

Each group will have a chair and an executive officer. The chairman will lead meetings, facilitate debate, represent the group in appropriate forums, champion group activities and be accountable to the Advisory Committee for group progress against agreed action plans. The executive officer will coordinate group operations, collate feedback, track projects, develop progress reports and deliver group contributions to the program’s regular communication and reporting activities. Any expenditure of Australian Government funds in relation to group operations will require approval from and be coordinated by DAFF.

In addition to relationships within the working groups, relationships between the groups and across the entire participant base need to be supported and nurtured. An annual national stakeholder workshop will be held to enable the Advisory Committee and DAFF to directly engage with stakeholders, gather feedback, affirm priorities, encourage networking, and generate momentum and enthusiasm for the next 12 months of work.

In line with the principle of continuous improvement, all stakeholders are encouraged to identify opportunities for improvements in program management and implementation.

Communications plan, 2010–14

The communication program provides a basis for stakeholder management and supports reporting, accountability, transparency, engagement and promotional aims. Many of the sectoral working groups have identified communication projects among their top priorities for action during phase 2.

The communication program has two primary objectives:

  • to increase awareness and understanding of the importance of sound practices in managing and ensuring the welfare of animals
  • to increase awareness of the various roles and responsibilities in delivering a duty of care for the welfare of animals.

Many stakeholders already have active communication programs, and the AAWS does not wish to add to the ‘noise’ in the operating environment. Instead, it aims to work with stakeholders, coordinate activities, provide funding support and strategic advice, and facilitate partnerled communication projects consistent with the strategy’s goals and objectives. Where a need has been identified, the strategy will produce and distribute general information on animal welfare and on the strategy itself.

Eight categories for communication partners have been identified to refine and direct work under the communication program (Table 8). Of these, four groups will have priority, as they are critical to the overall success of the program. It is expected that communication products and activities will flow through to the other groups without a need for them to be directly targeted.

The eight identified partner categories are:

  • strategy participants
  • animal welfare policy developers and regulators
  • animal welfare advisers and educators
  • animal users, carers and managers
  • the general Australian community
  • the media
  • potential funders
  • the international community.

The first four in this list are the priority groups for phase 2.

In addition to activities targeting one of more of the priority groups, some other supporting activities will assist the successful implementation of the communication plan. These include:

  • a mapping exercise to identify existing communication networks and pathways
  • development of flexible templates to be used by program partners in producing reports, discussion papers, presentations and fact sheets
  • use of online collaboration tools to support and engage participants and track progress
  • implementation of a web service to ensure public accessibility to information about the AAWS and its investments and activities, related information from program partners and links to sources of additional materials.

Quality assurance

Quality assurance means assuring the integrity and probity of all processes undertaken to implement the AAWS on time and on budget. It also involves monitoring progress against milestones and within budget.

As outlined above (under ‘Management and administration’), program management and expenditure of Australian Government funds will follow all DAFF requirements.

The improved work planning and progress reporting will deliver regular accountability and assurance checks for stakeholders. An independent, external review of the program in 2013–14 will provide an additional check on operations and outcomes.

Table 8. Communication partners and desired outcomes
Partner category Coverage Desired relationship Success measures Priority tactics Potential activities
Strategy participants People and organisations directly involved in the implementation of the strategy, including committee, working and writing group members, and other project team members
  • Commitment to the strategy and willingness to share information
  • Understanding of the diversity within animal welfare
  • Sharing of a common goal and open dialogue
Stronger networks; clear priorities; agreed communication outcomes and messages; higher profile of the strategy within identified networks; better understanding of partner progress Keep participant networks up to date with activities and progress.

Encourage and empower reporting of AAWS activities by participants (including projects) at conferences and meetings.

  • Regular update newsletter.
  • Online collaboration tools to support networking, learning and feedback.
  • Working group meetings.
  • National stakeholder workshop.
  • Website.
Policy developers and regulators People and organisations involved in the development and implementation of government, industry or organisational animal welfare policies or controls, including all levels of government, industry, nongovernment organisations, enforcement agencies and animal welfare inspectors
  • Use of evidence for the development of policy
  • A consultative approach and consistency in the implementation of policy and regulation
  • Awareness of the value that the strategy can provide
Recognition of the strategy and its benefits at senior levels; increased understanding of animal welfare issues among policy makers Ensure animal welfare policy developers and regulators are aware of the AAWS and relevant work in progress.

Encourage and support partner organisations to include positive animal welfare and AAWS messages in policy briefings.

Incorporate the AAWS into the work programs of Animal Welfare Committee members.

  • Regular update newsletter, highlighting progress, achievements and latest outcomes.
  • Online collaboration tools to support networking, learning and feedback.
  • Discussion papers on policy issues and considerations.
  • Project reports.
  • Workshops and seminars.
  • Website.
Advisers and educators People and organisations providing technical advice and expertise on animal welfare issues, including veterinarians, welfare scientists, researchers, teachers and animal behaviourists
  • Increased appreciation of the ethical responsibility associated with the use of animals
  • Appreciation of the independent expertise that this group can provide
  • Respect and willingness to share and extend knowledge
Recognition of the strategy and its benefits at senior levels; increased understanding of animal welfare issues among advisers and educators; improved quality of animal welfare education Support the development and distribution of educational resources and materials, for educators and students.

Promote use of appropriate existing and new resources in teacher packages (such as sheep and beef cattle handling, pet programs).

  • Regular update newsletter, highlighting progress, achievements and latest outcomes.
  • Online collaboration tools to support networking, learning and feedback.
  • Discussion papers on key issues.
  • Project reports.
  • Workshops and seminars.
  • Website.
Animal users, carers and managers People and organisations who have direct responsibility for delivering animal welfare, across the sectors for livestock; aquatic animals; companion animals; animals used in research; native, introduced and feral animals; and animals used for recreation, entertainment and display
  • Understanding of their responsibilities for animal welfare
  • Commitment to improve animal welfare
  • Mutual respect and confidence in advice provided through the strategy
Increased recognition and awareness of projects; increased use of resources developed through the strategy; greater recognition of responsibilities for animal welfare Provide access to balanced information on animal welfare, reflecting Australia's practices and approaches.

Support existing networks by providing information and resources on animal welfare.

  • Website.
  • Online collaboration tools to support networking, learning and feedback.
  • Articles and case studies for publication by program partners.

Attachment 1: Government committees with animal welfare coverage

Primary Industries Ministerial Council
Australian Government (Chair)

Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry

Australian Capital Territory

Chief Minister

New South Wales

Minister for Primary Industries

Minister for Rural Affairs

Minister for Mineral and Forest Resources

Northern Territory

Minister for Primary Industry, Fisheries and Resources

Queensland

Minister for Primary Industries and Fisheries

South Australia

Minister for Agriculture, Food and Fisheries

Minister for Forests

Minister for Environment and Conservation

Tasmania

Minister for Primary Industries and Water

Minister for Energy and Resources

Victoria

Minister for Agriculture

Western Australia

Minister for Agriculture and Food

Minister for Forestry

Minister for Fisheries

New Zealand

Minister for Agriculture

Minister for Biosecurity

Minister for Forestry

Observer

Papua New Guinea Minister for Agriculture and Livestock


Primary Industries Standing Committee
Australian Government (Chair)

Secretary, Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry

Australian Capital territory

Executive Director, Land Management and Planning, Department of Territory and Municipal Services

New South Wales

Director General, Industry & Investment NSW

Northern Territory

Chief Executive Officer, Department of Resources

Queensland

Associate Director General, Queensland

Primary Industries and Fisheries, Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation

South Australia

Chief Executive, Department of Water, Land and Biodiversity Conservation

Chief Executive, Primary Industries and Resources, South Australia

Tasmania

Secretary, Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Secretary, Department of Infrastructure, Energy and Resources

Victoria

Secretary, Department of Primary Industries

Western Australia

Director General, Department of Agriculture and Food

Chief Executive Officer, Department of Fisheries

General Manager, Forest Products Commission

New Zealand

Director General, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, NZ

Other Australian Government participants

Director of Meteorology, Bureau of Meteorology

Group Executive, CSIRO AgriBusiness, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)

Observer: Papua New Guinea—Secretary, Department of Agriculture and Livestock


Animal Welfare product Integrity taskforce
Senior executives from the following agencies
Australian Government

Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry

Australian Capital territory

Department of Territory and Municipal Services

New South Wales

Industry & Investment NSW

Northern Territory

Department of Resources

Queensland

Biosecurity Queensland, Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation

South Australia

Department of Primary Industries and Resources

Tasmania

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Victoria

Biosecurity Victoria, Department of Primary Industries

Western Australia

Department of Agriculture and Food

New Zealand

Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry

Observers

Product Safety and Integrity Committee Animal Health Australia


Animal Welfare Committee
Representatives from the following agencies
Australian Government

Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry

Australian Capital Territory

ACT Department of Territory and Municipal Services

New South Wales

Industry & Investment NSW

Northern Territory

Northern Territory Department of Local Government and Housing

Northern Territory Department of Regional Development, Primary Industries, Fisheries and Resources

Queensland

Biosecurity Queensland, Queensland Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation

South Australia

South Australian Department of Environment and Heritage

Department of Primary Industries and Resources, South Australia

Tasmania

Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Victoria

Victorian Department of Primary Industries

Western Australia

Western Australian Department of Agriculture and Food

Western Australian Department of Local Government and Regional Development

New Zealand

Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry

Observers

Animal Health Australia

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Chair, Australian Animal Welfare Advisory Committee

Attachment 2: Terms of reference and engagement of the Australian Animal Welfare Advisory Committee

Introduction

The Australian Government recognises the importance of animal welfare and has committed approximately $1 million per year from 2010–11 to 2013–14 to implement the Australian Animal Welfare Strategy. The Australian Animal Welfare Advisory Committee has responsibility for providing oversight for the strategy and its implementation, setting the broad direction, making recommendations regarding project funding and resource use, and delivering advice to the minister and the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry on current and emerging animal welfare issues of national or strategic significance.

Membership of the Advisory Committee is on the basis of skills and knowledge, rather than representation of a particular sector, organisation or industry. Collectively, the Advisory Committee must have demonstrated skills across industry and public policy, strategic planning and implementation, animal health and welfare, program management, research management, education, public affairs and communications.

The chair of the Animal Welfare Committee will be a member of the Advisory Committee.

Terms of reference

  1. To be advocates for and drive the implementation of the Australian Animal Welfare Strategy.
  2. To foster the involvement of the full spectrum of opinion in animal welfare in the development and implementation of the Australian Animal Welfare Strategy.
  3. To advise the Primary Industries Ministerial Council, through the Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, on nationally significant animal welfare issues and the implementation of the strategy.
  4. To identify issues/gaps in the existing animal welfare system in Australia and to provide advice on key performance indicators, priority work areas to address possible solutions and interim measures.
  5. To provide oversight of specific action plans in each sectoral and cross-sectoral group under the strategy.
  6. To establish a framework, including who will have carriage for the ongoing monitoring and review of animal welfare outcomes.

Modus operandi

  1. The Advisory Committee will meet in person and by teleconference as necessary.
  2. The department will provide technical support and secretariat support to the Advisory Committee.
  3. The department will fund travel, accommodation costs and pay a per diem sitting fee in line with Remuneration Tribunal guidelines for non-government members. It is assumed that government agencies will contribute ‘in-kind’ salary time of any involved staff.
  4. The Chairman of the Advisory Committee will be an observer on the Animal Welfare Committee, and the Chairman (or their delegate) of the Animal Welfare Committee will be a member of the Advisory Committee.

Terms of engagement

  1. Members of the Advisory Committee are appointed on the basis of their skills, knowledge and expertise, not as organisational representatives.
  2. Committee members should be appointed on the basis of overlapping four year terms except in the period to 30 June 2010.
  3. New appointments will continue to 30 June 2014.

Attachment 3: Terms of reference and engagement of Australian Animal Welfare Strategy working groups

Terms of reference

For their sector:

  1. To be advocates for and drive the implementation of the Australian Animal Welfare Strategy (sectoral action plan).
  2. To foster the involvement of the full spectrum of opinion in animal welfare in the development and implementation of the Australian Animal Welfare Strategy with respect to their sector.
  3. To develop advice and recommendations for the Australian Animal Welfare Advisory Committee on nationally significant animal welfare issues.
  4. To monitor, review and report progress against sectoral action plans and animal welfare outcomes.

Modus operandi

  1. The working group is the primary source of information with regard to matters that relate to their sector.
  2. The working group will co-opt additional expertise as necessary.
  3. The working group will have the opportunity to consult with peak bodies.

Groups will be sized and structured appropriately to the tasks they have identified and the nature of their sector, but will include members with the following skills or backgrounds:

  1. a jurisdiction
  2. an animal advocate organisation
  3. each of the relevant animal user groups that make up the sector
  4. animal welfare science skills
  5. relevant veterinary or animal health skills
  6. relevant sectoral peak bodies.

Terms of engagement

  1. Members of the working groups are invited to participate on the basis of their skills, knowledge, expertise and networks.
  2. Appointments will be reviewed as necessary to ensure appropriate sectoral coverage.

Attachment 4: Participants in the Australian Animal Welfare Strategy, 2005–10

AAWS Advisory Committee

  • Dr John Drinan (Chair) (2005–10)
  • Prof Ivan Caple, Chair, National Consultative Committee on Animal Welfare (2005–10)
  • Dr Hugh Wirth AM, Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) (2005–10)
  • Mr Keith Adams, Cattle Council of Australia (2005–10)
  • Mr Warren Starick OAM, National Farmers’ Federation (2005–10)
  • Dr Kevin Doyle, Australian Veterinary Association (2005–10)
  • Dr Maxine Cooper, Commissioner for the Environment, ACT Government (2005–09)
  • Associate Professor Heather Yeatman, University of Wollongong (2005–10)
  • Dr Gardner Murray, Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (2005–06)
  • Dr Robin Vandergraff, Department of Primary Industries and Resources, South Australia; Chair, Primary Industries Standing Committee Animal Welfare Working Group (2005–07)
  • Mr Dean Merriless, Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (2005–06)
  • Dr Bob Biddle, Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (2006–07)
  • Dr Rod Andrewartha, Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, Tasmania; Primary Industries Standing Committee Animal Welfare Working Group (2007–08)
  • Ms Sally Standen, Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (2007–08)
  • Dr Rick Symons, Chair, Primary Industries Standing Committee Animal Welfare Committee (2008–10)
  • Ms Nicola Hinder, Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (2008–09)
  • Mr Simon Murnane, Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (2009–10)

The Advisory Committee would like to acknowledge and thank everyone who has contributed to the strategy since its inception, particularly the members of the sectoral and cross-sectoral working groups whose time and effort has been instrumental in delivering achievements to date. We apologise for any omissions from the following participant lists. Omission is unintentional.

Sector committees

Animals used in research and teaching
Mrs Elizabeth Grant (Chair) National Health and Medical Research Council
Dr Steve Atkinson NSW Animal Welfare Advisory Council
Dr Simon Bain Australian National University
Dr Robert Baker Department of Primary Industries and Resources, South Australia
Dr Mary Bate University of Newcastle
Mr Arthur Blewitt Agri-Food Industry Skills Council
Ms Yvette Chen Victorian Department of Primary Industries
Mr Craig Cornwall Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
Dr Geoff Dandie Australian and New Zealand Council for the Care of Animals in Research and Teaching
Mr Alan Fried Victorian Department of Primary Industries
Ms Helen Gregoriou Jacobsen Entertainment Group
Prof Paul Hemsworth Animal Welfare Science Centre
Dr Mark Lawrie Australian Veterinary Association
Ms Jude Nettleingham Motomoda
Dr Denise Noonan University of Adelaide
Dr Mike Rickard Animal Welfare Science Centre
Prof Margaret Rose University of NSW and the Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine at the University of Sydney

Animal used for work, recreation, entertainment and display
Mr Matthew Crane (Chair) Industry & Investment NSW
Mr Grant Baldock Equestrian Federation of Australia
Dr Linda Beer Greyhounds Victoria
Mr Glenn Buckingham Delta Society Australia
Ms Mia Cobb Guide Dogs Victoria
Mr Steve Coleman RSPCA New South Wales
Mrs Sally Collins Poniewood Stud
Mrs Barbara Cooper National Kelpie Council
Ms Hollee Curran Delta Society Australia
Ms Hayley Findlay Zoo and Aquarium Association
Mr Andrew Harding Australian Racing Board
Mr Hunter Jones Australian Horse Industry Council
Mr Warren Lehmann Biosecurity Queensland, Queensland Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation
Mr John Le Mare Circus Federation of Australasia
Ms Tull Lutterall Australian Equine Welfare Association
Mr Greg McDougall Biosecurity Queensland, Queensland Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation
Professor Paul McGreevy University of Sydney
Dr Andrew McLean Australian Equine Behaviour Centre
Ms Jade Norris RSPCA Australia
Mr Michael O'Brien Cairns Tropical Zoo
Mr Geoff O'Neill Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service
Mr John Osborne Australian Professional Rodeo Association
Ms Wendy Parsons Animals Australia
Mr Mark Pearson Animals Australia
Ms Gail Ritchie Tamworth Regional Council
Dr Don Robertson National Kelpie Council
Ms Lynette Shanley Primates for Primates
Ms Katrina Sharman Voiceless
Ms Miranda Sherley RSPCA Australia
Mr Brian Sherman Voiceless
Dr Rick Symons (Chair, 2006-09) Biosecurity Queensland, Queensland Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation
Ms Christina Urso-Cale Australian Equine Welfare Association
Mr Franz Venhaus Equestrian Federation of Australia
Ms Erna Walraven Taronga Zoo
Mrs Jan Wilson Greyhounds Australia

Aquatic animals
Mr Justin Fromm (Chair) National Aquaculture Council
Dr Rod Andrewartha Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, Tasmania
Dr Onn Ben-David RSPCA Victoria
Mr Simon Bennison (Chair, 2006-2009) National Aquaculture Council
Dr Paul Hardy-Smith Panaquatic Health Solutions
Mr Pheroze Jungalwalla Tasmanian Salmonid Growers' Association
Ms Gaye Looby Department of Fisheries Western Australia
Mr Brett McCallum Pearl Producers Association
Mr Len Olyott RecFish Australia
Ms Glenys Oogjes Animals Australia
Mr Shane Willis Aquarium Industries Pty Ltd

Companion animals
Dr Kersti Seksel (Chair) Australian Companion Animal Council
Mr Tim Adams Petcare Information and Advisory Service
Ms Diane Bennit Australian Horse Industry Council
Ms Jane Bindloss Veterinary Nurses Council of Australia
Dr Ross Burton Industry & Investment NSW
Mr Paul Chapman New South Wales Department of Local Government
Mr Tony Cooke Petcare Information and Advisory Service
Ms Maryann Dalton Animal Welfare League, New South Wales
Dr Kevin Doyle Australian Veterinary Association
Mr Hugh Gent Australian National Kennel Council
Ms Julia Hardaker Animal Management in Rural, Remote and Indigenous Communities (AMRRIC)
Dr Michael Hayward Gungahlin Veterinary Hospital
Ms Tracy Helman Victorian Department of Primary Industries
Mr Michael Linke RSPCA Australian Capital Territory
Ms Naomi Pearson Victorian Department of Primary Industries
Dr Roger Perkins Pet Industry Association of Australia
Dr Carole Webb Cat Protection Society of Victoria
Dr Hugh Wirth RSPCA Victoria
Ms Susie Wisniewski Avicultural Society of Australia

Livestock and production animals
Mr Mike Bond (Chair) Animal Health Australia
Ms Jacqueline Baptista Australian Egg Corporation Ltd
Ms Maria Butler Sheepmeat Council of Australia
Mr Ian Cathles Goat Industry Council of Australia
Mr Geoff Cornford Australian Lotfeeders' Association
Mr Ron Cullen Sheepmeat Council of Australia
Ms Carole de Fraga Compassion in World Farming—Oceania
Dr Kevin de Witte Animal Health Australia
Dr Drewe Ferguson CSIRO Livestock Industries
Dr Andrew Fisher University of Melbourne
Mr Luke Fraser Australian Livestock Transporters Association
Mr Ralph Hood (Chair, 2006-08) Animal Health Australia
Dr Vivien Kite Australian Chicken Meat Federation
Mr Tony Maher Australian Food and Grocery Council
Mr Jed Matz Cattle Council of Australia
Mr Alastair Moore Australian Livestock Exporters' Council
Mr Christian Mulders Australian Meat Industry Council
Ms Bridget Peachey Dairy Australia
Prof Clive Phillips Centre for Animal Welfare and Ethics
Ms Kathleen Plowman Australian Pork Limited
Mr David Pollock Livestock Saleyards Association of Victoria
Mr Geoff Power WoolProducers Australia
Dr Carol Sheridan Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry
Mr Kevin Shiell Australian Dairy Farmers Limited
Mr Warren Starick National Farmers' Federation
Dr Stephen Tate Victorian Department of Primary Industries
Ms Melina Tensen RSPCA Australia
Mr Justin Toohey Cattle Council of Australia
Dr Keith Walker Meat & Livestock Australia
Mr Tony White Saleyard Operators Association

Native, introduced and feral animals
Dr Deborah Kelly (Chair) South Australian Department of Environment and Heritage
Mr Alan Bowman Victorian Farmers Federation
Dr Adrian Bradley University of Queensland
Dr Maxine Cooper ACT Government
Assoc Prof Tony English University of Sydney
Dr Bidda Jones RSPCA Australia
Mr Frank Keenan Biosecurity Queensland, Queensland Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation
Mr John Kelly Kangaroo Industry Association
Ms Samara McPhedran Field & Game Australia
Mr Will Meikle Taronga Conservation Society Australia
Dr Tony Peacock Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre
Dr Ken Richardson Murdoch University
Ms Dominique Thiriet Animals Australia

Cross-sectoral committees

Communications
Mr Warren Starick (Chair) National Farmers' Federation
Ms Jacqueline Baptista Australian Egg Corporation Ltd
Ms Lisa Chalk RSPCA Australia
Ms Caroline Dalton Biosecurity Queensland, Queensland Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation
Ms Yvette Farrell Meat & Livestock Australia, and Livecorp
Mr Brett Fifield Industry & Investment NSW
Ms Trudy Glasgow Industry & Investment NSW
Mr Brett Heffernan National Farmers' Federation
Ms Anna Inglis Meat & Livestock Australia, and Livecorp
Dr Bidda Jones RSPCA Australia
Ms Emma Keogh National Farmers' Federation
Ms Gaye Looby Department of Fisheries Western Australia
Ms Lisa Palu CSIRO Livestock Industries
Dr Kersti Seksel Australian Companion Animal Council

Education and training
Dr Peter Thornber (Chair) Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry
Prof Ivan Caple University of Melbourne
Mr Cameron Archer Industry & Investment NSW
Ms Sally Bannerman New South Wales Department of Education and Training
Ms Juanita Caddy Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
Prof Grahame Coleman School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine
Dr Di Evans Western Australian Department of Agriculture and Food
Mr Rupert McGregor Australian Council of State School Organisations
Mr Ian Rodger Biosecurity Queensland, Qld Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation
Prof Margaret Rose University of NSW and the Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine at the University of Sydney
Mr Warren Starick National Farmers' Federation
Ms Eileen Thumpkin RSPCA Queensland
Associate Professor Heather Yeatman (Chair, 2007-09) University of Wollongong

Research and development
Mr Keith Adams (Chair) National Farmers' Federation Quarantine Committee
Mr Bernie Bindon Meat & Livestock Australia
Dr John Drinan Australian Animal Welfare Strategy Advisory Committee
Dr Andrew Fisher University of Melbourne
Mr Justin Fromm National Aquaculture Council
Prof Paul Hemsworth Animal Welfare Science Centre
Dr Tony Peacock Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre
Prof Clive Phillips Centre for Animal Welfare and Ethics
Dr Mike Rickard Animal Welfare Science Centre
Dr Kersti Seksel Australian Companion Animals Council
Dr John Stewart Agforce Queensland
Dr Rick Symons Biosecurity Queensland, Queensland Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation
Dr Alan Tilbrook Monash University

Animal welfare staff in the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, AAWS Phase 1 (2005-10)
Ms Christie Allan Dr Tamira Ford Mr Jim Paradice
Ms Kathleen Allan Dr Emma Haslam Ms Angelika Poulsen
Ms Nisha Bajpe Mr Peter Hicks Ms Hayley Roach
Ms Olivia Bartlett Ms Naomi Hilborn Ms Karina Scott
Ms Clare Bennetts Ms Tegan Honing Dr Allan Sheridan
Ms Jo Burley Ms Rebecca Lathbury Ms Julia Smith
Mr Peter Coggins Mr Tim Lester Ms Jane Speechley
Ms Michelle Connelly Mr Sam Lyall Mr Matthew Tant
Ms Rhiannon Coulton Ms Kristy McPhillips Dr Peter Thornber
Ms Lorraine Follett Mr David Mitchell Mr Justin Trefry
Mr Malcolm Forbes Ms Danusha Nainanayake Mr Scott Turner
Dr Linda Walker

1. World Organisation for Animal Health 2010, Terrestrial animal health code, viewed 4 February 2011

2. Animal Health Australia 2010, Animal health in Australia 2009.

3. Australian Companion Animal Council 2010, Contribution of the pet care industry to the Australian economy, viewed 31 August 2010

4. Website 

5. Website, Chapter 3


Australian Animal Welfare Strategy and National Implementation Plan 2010-14

April 2011 PIMC endorsed edition

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